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Houston Breakthrough, October 1980
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Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Pages 4 and 5. October 1980. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 6, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1566.

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(October 1980). Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Pages 4 and 5. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1566

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, October 1980 - Pages 4 and 5, October 1980, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 6, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1588/show/1566.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, October 1980
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date October 1980
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Pages 4 and 5
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_564c.jpg
Transcript jf\ HOUSTON f ft | B)icoktJyuuigw October 1980 vol. 5, no. 8 LOCAL COLOR ADVERTISING Virginia Rail CIRCULATION Sonia Dawidowicz, Theresa Di Menno Diane Harrington, Melissa Hauge Chloe Mallet, Debra Thornton COPY EDITORS Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff Morris Edelson DESIGN David Crossley EDITORS Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff David Crossley, Morris Edelson LISTINGS Debi Martin, Kathleen Packlick Virginia Rail OFFICE Janice Blue, Virginia Rail PHOTOGRAPHERS David Crossley, Nancy Dahlberg Theresa Di Menno, Gary Allison Morey PRODUCTION Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff Nancy Dahlberg, Sonia Dawidowicz Janet Meyer, Kathleen Packlick Virginia Rail PROOFREADERS Gabrielle Cosgriff, Nancy Dahlberg RADIO SHOW Co-hostsonKPFT-FM90.1: Nancy Lane Fleming, Rita Saylors Production Staff: Blanca Balderas, Gertrude Barnestone Michelle Batchelder, Leslie Conner Jack Drake, Stella Fleming Marge Glaser, Karen Saylors TYPESETTERS Janice Blue, Mary Fouts Virginia Meyers, Lynne Mutchler Application to mail at controlled circulation rates pending at Houston, Texas. Houston Breakthrough is published monthly (except for the bimonthly issues of July/August and December /January) by the Breakthrough Publishing Company, 1708 Rosewood, Houston, TX 77004. Mailing address: P. 0. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004. Tel. 713/526-6686. Subscriptions are $7 (one year), $13 (two years) and $18 (three years). Library and institutional rates are $15 (one year), $20 (two years) and $25 (three years). Newsstand and single copy rate is $1.00. This publication is on file at the International Women's History Archive in the Special Collections Library, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60201. POSTMASTER Send form 3579 to Houston Breakthrough, P. O. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004. MUNICIPAL MIRROR Joplin remembered, politicians in passing, and books, baking, marathons and marmalade, etc... -BY MORRIS EDELSON J.J. We Hardly Knew Ye It's been 10 years since Janis Joplin departed the stage (Oct. 4, 1970) and, curiously, no one has done an adequate biography or study of the Port Arthur singer. Judith Richards, a local free lance writer sometimes appearing in these pages, just completed a taped radio show for Sud- West Deutsche Rundfunk and found a certain amount of nostalgia about Janis and a lot of dissatisfaction with representations of her in Going Down with Janis and Bette Midler's The Rose. People who knew her before she became famous thought San Francisco (drugs, booze and" cash-on-the-barrelhead sex) killed her; those from the Bay area who knew her later said the ugliness of the Gulf Coast did in the sensitive woman. Some say the world ends in dope, some say in sludge — either one will do to turn your mind to fudge, no doubt. But Ryan Trimble, once co-owner of Liberty Hall in Houston and also the Half-Way House in Beaumont, where she sang, believes she had a rather heroic carelessness. She was a talent confident enough of herself not to sweat the small stuff; she wasn't afraid enough to save herself. Trimble recalled how the singer used to show up, "wired and berserk," to sing a few old tunes with new words that she would improvise. She especially liked Cry, Cry, Cry in the mid-60s and, especially, Going Down to Brownsville, Janis "had a hard on for straights," Trimble said and she was beginning to try to make it in Austin. "Austin was and is as dumb as Port Arthur so she was getting some ter rible disappointments there — everyone was just freaked by her and couldn't hear her songs past her looks," Trimble said. The same situation, he said, ironically prevails today, with people looking at Bette Midler's imitations and not hearing the great difference in voice and renditions. "Janis had that rhythm-and-blues, rock and roll background that Midler'* New York treatments of songs lack. "Janis was really good to me," Trimble recalled. "She never took a dime for singing at the Halfway House, and she had a following, a small group, that would come for her there. She was a handful, though. I sold the club to Bob Leviston and Dave Hargis and Leviston finally banned her from the place. She was flipping the bird to people, or something." The police tried to set the place up for drug busts and the city fathers were unpleased by the counterculture scene developing in Beaumont, so Trimble soon moved to Houston to open Liberty Hall (with Phil Bowles, now in the furniture business on Washington.) For seven years (see Breakthrough, January 1980) his establishment was the center of the new music culture of Houston. "I had so wanted to get Janis there," Trimble said. "I wanted to go out there and say, look, Janis, here's finally a place where a lot of people are going to love your songs — but it was then too late." (Trimble opened Liberty Hall in February 1971). People shake their heads, recalling the bottle of whiskey in her purse, or her tongue jabbing into their mouths, her hands groping an introduction all over their bodies. But no one seems sorry to have known Janis, all miss her music and wonder what she would have gone on to. When a meteor burns out, its fiery trail still lights up the sky, even over those Port Arthur refineries. Junk-et Hizzoner spent a pleasant September, thankyou, touring the bigger waste disposal plants of Munich and warming up for Octoberfest in Suds City. An official release on expensive paper from the mayor's office quoted Jim McConn as saying, "While in Germany I will visit two of the world's most successful solid waste recovery plants. I will share with the delegates the methods we have employed in solving some of Houston's problems." McConn's statement leads to a question: Which problems has he solved lately? Does he tie his own shoelaces? McConn delivered the keynote address at the "Large Cities Forum" in Munich which is closer to the Monte Carlo casinos than Houston is to Las Vegas. Meanwhile, back at the municipal corral, a Mr. Roger Line is running the city. In case you don't recall voting for him, he is a Top Man drawing a Top Salary, $60,000 per year, almost double what other mayoral executive assistants are making. His official title is Senior Executive Assistant and he will function as City Manager. His qualifications? He engineered a Proposition 13 type of service-cutting budget for the Fort Worth city government and he packaged the bond issue that saddled Fort Worth tax-payers with more debt to give them a bus system that isn't much better than Houston's today. The City Hall press release on bond triple-A stock reveals the bottom Line credentials: "More recently, he has held positions in real estate development. . ." So, expect another bond issue for the MTA soon — if it passes people will get from the suburbs to the city quicker, as they did in Fort Worth for a while, and the lower-income folks will die of old age, as usual, waiting for that Westmoreland or Alabama bomb-without-windows. China Peeking Being the consul for the People's Republic of China is not all wushu and fortune cookies. Poor Mr. Yu has to sail out of his Montrose Street office and pose for pictures with lizards given to the Houston zoo by the People's Republic, preside over festivities around the October birthday of his country and, occasionally, put up with gaffes from the likes of Bob Coussins, onetime industrial filmmaker and now scoring pretty regular foreign junkets — mostly talking-head shows in expensive locations. Coussins was regaling Consul Yu with stories of his three-week, $50,000 trip to China for Channel 8, to make a movie a- bout Houston ballet director Ben Stevenson at the Peking Ballet School. Coussins told of buying a serge coat and Mao jacket to wear with his cowboy boots. The center of attention — no shy violet he — at a Chinese department store, he turned to the crowd watching the Roundeye buy his coat and asked, "How do you like it?" Several people actually helped him fit it right then and there. Bones in the Gravesyard - view of one of the pieces at the Nancy Graves exhibition at the CAM. A lone Dodger fan takes his life in his hands to celebrate a minor Los Angeles success in the Astrodome last month. The Astros went on to win, however. Coussins taught his interpreter to say "Bugger off!" He and his camera crew chased Stevenson on bicycles, filming on those bicycle trucks they have in the Forbidden City, with Coussins running down the street yelling directions. Stevenson did his part to weird out the one billion citizens of his host country by insisting that they grunt and groan to the strains of acid rock and become instant Westerners in his three week visit. Stevenson's and Coussins' deep appreciation of Chinese culture and history may be inferred from the remarks Coussins let fall to Yu the night of the report on the upcoming film, tentatively entitled Pas de Deux - Contact of Two Cultures. Coussins was saying, "Chinese culture seems to be making great inroads into Houston. There is even a sister city program between Houston here and Taipei." Silence. Coussins pressed on: "Now, Taipei - where is that? In the south of China somewhere?" Heavier silence. Bob was soon off and running again, pausing only long enough to hear that Susan Spruce brought home the national convention of US China People's Friendship Committee, to be held next October in Houston. David Ross, who was represented at the above meeting by boxes of books from his metamorphosed Prairie Fire Book Store, says his 60s hangout has not closed but is resting. The city's largest collection . of China books and periodicals and other progressive publications is still available from Ross through a post office box. Ross himself is a teaching assistant > now in the English Department at the 8 University of Houston and is taking a side U course in Chinese. It was Ross in the truck 2 on the airport ramp helping the Fujian g hand puppeteers load into and on top of his vehicle some 1800 pounds of props and ,| scenery for their recent Houston tour. A- >a nother of his activities is the Moonlight Madness bicycle tour of Houston, later this month, which slices several times through the central city,starting at the mid night, and ending up, usually, at some greasy spoon or other for the weary participants. One Hand Sues, the Other Doesn't Breakthrough readers will be overjoyed to learn that Robert Cizik, chief executive officer of Cooper Industries, one of the Houston area's major polluters, won the 1980 Award for Human Relations from the Houston Council on Human Relations, 2518 Grant (no pun intended) Street. Cizik (pronounced Cheese-ik) is one of the main men who funnels the Corporate Arts collections to the major, safe, cultural organizations of Houston, such as the Grand Opera, Houston Symphony and Alley Theater. Previous winners of the a- ward, by the United Way-funded organization located across from the Mining Company disco, were Exxon, Shell Oil, a Mr. James McConn and Barbara Jordan. Presenting this year's award on Oct. 15 will be oily John Mazzola, president of the Lincoln Center for the Soporific Arts of New York. Harriet E. Hubacker, Senior Assistant Attorney of Houston, resigned from her position as of Sept. 26, 1980. Hubacker noted in her letter of departure to Edward A. Cazares, City Attorney, that there are problems of unrest, reduced productivity and poor work in the city's legal office. Cazares himself, she charged, "discourages women from staying." Her letter said: "Your frequent sexual comments create a non-professional and demeaning work environment for women. It is a sad example." Hubacker had run up an outstanding record of efficiency in the usually-somnolent city office, but she stated that the potential of the staff is thwarted by the sex ism and racism practiced in City Hall. Her letter concluded: "I know it must be difficult to recognize and accept that women . . . have career aspirations and goals. It must be also hard to accept that (the Legal Department) is no longer an all-male club, but sooner or later you will have to accept that fact. Women have a right to e- qual employment and economic opportunity as well as a right to contribute. You will discover that if you will give them those opportunities, that everyone — you, the department, the client and the citizens of the city we represent - will all benefit from the contributions women can make in city government." As we go to press, we learn that Hubacker is pressing sex discrimination charges against her ex-boss and the City. Science Lurches On: DeBakey, Watanabe/ Rely, Smoking, Picciano, Asbestos and Bull Semen In case you are wondering what Michael DeBakey, sometimes surgeon in residence at the Baylor College of Medicine, does between burying his mistakes (he operated on the Pshaw of Iran this spring), he deals in buildings and power. He claimed it is only coincidental, his Pavlevi-si icing and new medical building he is dedicating this month, along with Lady Bird Johnson and Leon Jaworski, but his new erection is the largest at Baylor in more than a decade, according to communications director Gayle McNutt, and cost multi-millions of dollars. DeBakey insists His Highness paid not a piastre for the surgery, and his Highness isn't talking, but a list of patrons of the Baptist medical facility does indeed include a few with names suggestive of faraway places. DeBakey is Baylor's chancellor, chairman of surgery, and star fullback in the grants games. Jaworski, a leading lawyer in Houston, HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH OCTOBER 1980