Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977
Page 19
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977 - Page 19. May 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1393/show/1392.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1977). Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977 - Page 19. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1393/show/1392

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977 - Page 19, May 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1393/show/1392.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Date May 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Feminism
  • Lesbians
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ75 .P64
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 19
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_424s.jpg
Transcript r What Con Feminists Celebrate? Mayday, or Beltane, as it is called in Gaelic, begins on the sunset of April 30th and lasts approximately four days. This is a celebration whose roots lie in ancient pre-Christian religions that held ?t the core of their beliefs a reverence for the life force that is shared and expressed by all creation. The turning wheel of the seasons, the continually changing relationships between sun, moon and stars were an essential part of this cosmology. They provided opportunities fdr our foremothers and fathers to renew their connections to the cycles of heaven and earth. In the traditions of Celtic Witchcraft, Beltane is one of the four gre.t yearly Sabbats. The feature of the May festivals with which most of us are probably familiar with is the maypole. This colorful ceremony signified the gifts of the moon goddess who was said to bestow increase to crops and insure blessings to the participants. As the dancers would circle ^round the great fires and the maypoles decorated with garlands of fruits, flowers and ribbons, they were expressing in their own way their understanding of the connections that existed between their personal lives and the powers of continuity and creation. n^tu or r crea sour We h can rel e ness i ntu shar knew ri te and 41 It is curious that, in this time of increasing alienation from re, the pagan movement is again resurfacing in the world in the form enewod interest in witchcraft, healing, earth celebrations, and tive ritual. It is yet another sign of our need to return to our ce, to be centered and at harmony with ourselves and our environment, ave n g.ected our power to create and participate in rituals that link us to greater cosmic processes. There is a need to develop vant forms that can collectively and individually reflect our dark- and pain, our joy and thankfulness as we travel onward. Our ition may again surface in the invention of new kinds of gifting, ceremonial feasts, and seasonal celebrations. Our ancestors , and shared this wisdom in the power of their circles, and in the s that told of the ceaseless ebb and flow of cycles...the going out the inevitable return...the spinning of the infinite circumference nlch v, ^ are all centers. -Prairie Jackson A