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Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977
Page 16
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Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977 - Page 16. May 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1393/show/1389.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1977). Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977 - Page 16. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1393/show/1389

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977 - Page 16, May 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1393/show/1389.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Date May 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Feminism
  • Lesbians
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ75 .P64
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 16
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_424p.jpg
Transcript MMy Super-Patriots' Cam Accept libbers' 6 Other Ml "America, Love It or Leave It." "Stop the ERA." "Nix Nikki." ^»* "Abortion is Murder." "Save Our Children: Keep Homos Out of the ST* Classroom." "Porno is Pollution." "If Guns are Outlawed, Only Out- C^' laws Will Have Guns." C^ The same individuals who are most likely to have red, white, and blue bumper stickers proclaiming their love of America plastered on their cars are also the most likely to be against the ERA, the Women's Advocate, freedom of sexual preference, and pornography. These persons envision themselves as "super-patriots" (not to be confused with "super-democrats") yet they hold very intolerant attitudes toward the rights of various minority groups to exercise freedom of speech and to hold minority opinions. These blatant inconsistencies have long been observed by psychologists and sociologists. It is hardly "news" that only a small portion of the American population is committed to the principles of democracy (as opposed to merely the symbols). Sad, but true, is the fact that while many people are vocally supportive of "democracy," unable to translate such slogans into democratic patterns of Thus, we have Geneve Kirk Brooks' who try to convince us "super-patriotism" while simultaneously attacking other (Americans, no less!) desires to gain rights whether in opportunities, sexual preferences, child-bearing activi- they are behavior, of their persons' employment ties, or reading materials. Such inconsistencies have generally been found to be more characteristic of persons with low levels of education, usually from working-class backgrounds. These persons are particularly intolerant of other persons' viewpoints on civi1-1iberty type issues. Psychological studies indicate that such individuals often feel estranged, bewildered, and overwhelmed by a complex world; thus they seek simple explanations of what is happening in that world. These behavior patterns are not deliberate but are the results of these persons' early home environments--generally characterized by punishment, lack of love, tension, and aggression. Their early childhoods were likely in very authoritarian environments where there was little room for, or tolerance of, diversity of opinion. In addition, since these persons usually leave school early, their adult working years are spent in close contact with other persons of similarly restricted cultural, educational, and family backgrounds. In order for these persons to more order this "complex" world they tend to explain everything in terms of a "scapegoat". May 1977 m