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Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977
Page 14
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Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977 - Page 14. May 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1393/show/1387.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1977). Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977 - Page 14. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1393/show/1387

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977 - Page 14, May 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1393/show/1387.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Date May 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Feminism
  • Lesbians
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ75 .P64
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_424n.jpg
Transcript On March 9th, seven citizens addressed City Council on the subject of the Women's Advocate, criticizing her attendance at' an International Women's Day Rally the previous Saturday. They attacked her endorsement of the ERA and accused her of actively "promoting lesbianism and abortions." Catherine Lemm described Van Hightower as "associating with causes that are ungodly and finding her support in promoting demands by sex perverts who are breaking the law." That same afternoon, Councilman Louis Macey proposed a motion requesting the City Legal Department to prepare an ordinance to lower the salary of the Women's Advocate to one dollar a year. The Council passed Macey's motion 6-1, with Mayor Hofheinz dissenting and Frank Mann and Johnny Goyen absent. Since they are not authorized to hire and fire personnel, Council was attempting to use its budgeting powers to put an end to Van Hightower's employment. The biggest controversy Houston City government has seen in years ensued over the next three weeks. Van Hightower supporters and detractors took every opportunity to exhort City Council to either relinquish or maintain their stand on the issue. When the dol1ar-a-year move was found to be illegal, Councilman Frank Mancuso moved to abolish the position of Women's Advocate altogether. On March 30th, minutes after Council passed the abolishment ordinance 6-3, Mayor Hofheinz, who had supported Van Hightower throughout the uproar, announced that he had hired her as a special assistant on his staff, with the same duties and salary as before. The chain of events surrounding the Women's Advocate controversy made a lot of people sit up and take notice. Women and men from a broad spectrum of social, political, and economic backgrounds came together on this issue. For many, it was a first lesson in city government -- who's in it and how it works. First of all, we learned that Wednesday morning is the time to go down to City Hall and address City Council personally. We learned that we have only to call the City Secretary the day before to reserve a few moments to speak on any subject; we also found out very quickly that the Council members tend to talk on the phone, stare at the wall and leave the room during these "pop-off" sessions. We identified some of the anti-feminist backlash in our community. It was interesting to note that several individuals who protested loudly that no member of N.O.W. should be permitted to hold the office of Women's Advocate were themselves members of such extreme rightwing organizations as the American Party and the John Birch Soci ety. By the same token, we were able to identify community support May 1977