Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977
Page 8
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977 - Page 8. May 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1393/show/1381.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1977). Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1393/show/1381

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977 - Page 8, May 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1393/show/1381.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Date May 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Feminism
  • Lesbians
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ75 .P64
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_424h.jpg
Transcript continued from page 7 by a naturally-inclined heterosexual. And the only time a naturally- inclined homosexual can be accused of acting "against nature" is if she or he is indulging in heterosexual activities. There are scriptures that do clearly condemn homosexuality— but only male homosexuality. In Biblical times, male homosexuality was closely connected to pagan fertility rites and therefore associated with idolatry in Jewish minds. It was also believed that the male was solely responsible for the creation of life, so his semen must not be wasted in non-procreative sexual activities. The low regard for women also contributed to the attitude toward male homosexuality. The male who lowered himself to play the role of the woman to another male was held in utter contempt. Much of the basis for the discrimination against homosexuality rests upon the creation story in Genesis, where man and woman are commanded to replenish the earth. This emphasizes the reproductive role of sex and encourages heterosexual activity as the normal, natural mode of sexual expression. However, we should keep in mind that the Bible actually opens with the exodus. The creation story is a flashback, written by a people for whom reproduction was absolutely vital for survival. Nature has endowed humans with a dual sexual nature, providing flexibility in adjusting to changing times and circumstances. If the creation story was a flashback from our time and place in history—a time of dwindling natural resources and over-population—we might write it a little differently. And the homosexual side of human nature might be encouraged more since it allows love without reproduction. McNeill says the Bible refutes those who equate homosexuality with sin and who claim there is no place for the homosexual in the kingdom of God. The scripture he refers to is a prophecy in Isaiah 56:2-8 which says that when the Messiah comes the eunuch will be given a special place in the Lord's house and an immortal value. McNeill states that this prophecy applies to the homosexual because the term "eunuch" in the New Testament is used not only in its literal sense—i.e., those who have been physically castrated—but also in a symbolic sense for all those who for various reasons do not marry and bear children. In Matthew 19:12 Jesus gives the closet description of a homosexual that we have in the Bible when he says: "There are eunuchs who have been so from birth..." In the second portion of his book, McNeill dwells on the positive contributions the gay community can make to society and the church. The last part of the book deals with the church's pastoral ministry to and for the gay community. Here he points out that "the church has a serious moral responsibility out of both justice and charity to work for the reform of laws concerning homosexuals and do everything within its power to educate the faithful to the need of such reform." Until the churches, en masse, break their silence and support the uman rights of homosexuals, we must continue to prod, berate, and Pointblank Tii mes