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Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977
Page 7
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Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977 - Page 7. May 1977. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1393/show/1380.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1977). Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1393/show/1380

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977 - Page 7, May 1977, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1393/show/1380.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Pointblank Times, Vol. 3, No. 3, May 1977
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Date May 1977
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Feminism
  • Lesbians
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ75 .P64
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_424g.jpg
Transcript Book Review Homosexuals & Sin: Much Ado About Nothing The Church and the Homosexual, John J. McNeill, S.J., Published by Andrews and McMeel , Inc. 6700 Squibb Rd, Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66202. $10.00. Homosexuality has come out of the closet and we are now feeling the backlash. Promoting lesbianism was one of the first charges flung at Nikki Van Hightower; legalizing homosexual marriages is one of the big bullets being fired from anti-ERA guns; and Anita Bryant (with the media eye full upon her) has put her orange juice in cold storage while she battles gays from her self-erected pulpit. The logic of human rights is in danger of becoming lost in an emotion- charged furor over sin and depravity. In spite of the progress we've made, homosexuals are still standing on the time-worn battlefield of Sodom and Gomorrah, fighting religious misconceptions and Biblical misinterpretation. And we're all being governed by laws inspired by a people who lived 2,000 years ago and whose requirements for survival were very different from our own. The Church and the Homosexual, written by Jesuit priest John J. McNeill, is a mi 1estone —not only because it challenges traditional scriptural interpretation, but because it was published with the permission (if not the sanction) of the Catholic church. It offers hope that organized religion, as a body, will one day admit it has been wrong in its judgement and persecution of the homosexual. McNeill's opening shot is a wel1-researched broadside that splinters the traditional interpretation of scripture which made homosexuals responsible for floods, earthquakes, famines, and other violent acts of nature for hundreds of years. He de-homosexes the Sodom and Gomorrah story by correcting a gross error in translation and puts the blame for the destruction of the two cities where the Bible has always said the blame belonged—on inhospitality to strangers and other assorted transgressions. The Old Testament prophets weren't shy about listing the sins that toppled Sodom and Gomorrah, but homosexuality isn't on that list. Paul and his phrase "against nature" in Romans 1:26 is another Biblical condemnation that's thrown in the face of gays (often by our court judges). But McNeill thoughtfully appraises the full context of Paul's teachings and concludes that Paul is referring to heterosexuals who go against their basic nature by indulging in homosexual activities. Logically, it follows that the only time homosexuality is an "abomination" is when the homosexual acts are being committed May 1977 u