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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 9, September 1979
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NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 9, September 1979 - Page 6. September 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 21, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1356/show/1350.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(September 1979). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 9, September 1979 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1356/show/1350

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 9, September 1979 - Page 6, September 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 21, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1356/show/1350.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 7, No. 9, September 1979
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date September 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 6
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File Name femin_201109_389f.jpg
Transcript Hypertension from 'pill' fairly common Thursda . December Chicago Daily <& 1976, News High blood pressure induced by oral contraceptives, once though! lo be a rarity, is "cxtemely common;' says a hypertension expert. In time, it develops in about one out of every 20 pill users, says Dr. John H. Laragh of Now York, who first reported the condition nine years ago. "Five per cent of the millions of women using j the oral contraceptive pill i is a large number (about l 500.000) wi th induced j hypertension." he says in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. "It is reason for concern. Some concern must also be summoned in behalf of the even larger group of women in whom there is an induced rise in | blood pressure, albeit still ; within the normal range." Laragh, director of the ! hypertension and cardiovascular center at New ; York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, said the high blood pressure can be checked and reversed in almost all'cases if the pill is withdrawn. In confirming Laraph's original finding nine years ago, other c'inics have reported an incidence of pill- induced hypertension ranging from just a few per cent up to 18 per cent or more. Laragh does not recommend abandoning the pill because the risk of an unwanted pregnancy m a y bring even greater h a z- ards. "It would be helpful if we could identify the susceptible women in advance." said Laragh, "but the data so far provide oniv suggestions." The pill, he advised, should be used with care or forbidden in women wilh a history of high blood pressure.' with kidney disease, a history of toxemia or high b'ood pressure in previous pregnancies, a family tendency to high blood pressure or a history of excessive weight gain or fluid retention during the menstrual cycle. Pdge 10, Section 1 Saturday, September 25, 1976 Houston Chronicle Mother Was 'Mortified' By Gynecologist's Ways Parley hears women's role in health care © 1975. Chicago Daily News '" Dr. Joni Magee, the female gynecologist, complained recently that male doctors lack consideration in performing pelvic examinations on women. Her complaint was reported in several newspapers, including t h e Houston Chronicle. An Oregon mother was prompted to comment: "That hit home. Our 18-year-old daugh- ' tcr was given a pelvic exam for a Pap Congresswoman says sterilizations wild WASHINGTON (UPI) - Government- subsidized sterilizations of poor and minority women are "virtually out of control," Rep. Shirley Chisholm has charged. Chisholm, D-N.Y., said at a hearing sponsored by the Department of Health, Education and Welfare that tighter restrictions are needed on sterilization procedures. The department has proposed the elmi- nation of federal funding for sterilizations performed on women inadequately informed about the procedure and its consequences or who are forced to undergo the surgery on threat of losing welfare or other federal aid. The government now pays for about 100,000 sterilizations a year Chisholm said she supports the idea behind HEW's proposals, but said they are still too vague to protect mentally incompetent people and those in prisons and other institutions. Section 6, PageS WASHINGTON (UPI) — Health care in the United States is provided by ' ' a veritable army of female workers . . . dominated by a tiny cadre of largely male physicians a n d adminislrotors," an International C o n- ferenee on Women in Health was told Monday. T h e description was provided by Barbara Ehrenreich of the Women's Health Forum in New York City, an activist author w h o delivered t h e opening address on the status of women as health care providers in the United States. The forum is a research and resource center on women's health problems. White House official John Veneman opened t h e three- day conference of 300 representatives from every conli- Pcige 4/A smear required on a college health report. The doctor explained nothing, spoke not a word as he took the smear. Our daughter was in tears and when I approached the doctor about this he said it was just a routine task and he didn't usually explain anything. I said that even after having two children my gynecologist always chatted with me to create a more relaxed atmosphere. I had to spend an hour with our daughter to take away fears she had about having a baby or ever marrying and having intercourse. "The doctor claimed he hadn't seen an 18-year-old virgin in five years and could not understand her reaction to the exam. I told him I was shocked to realize there were doctors who had no compassion or respect for a human being. "I might add another personal incident In the Pittsburgh, Pa., area I visited a gynecologist for the first and last time. I had moved into town and had not met the doctor before. He entered the room after I had been 'prepared' and 'positioned' by the nurse. His entry was made by his singing, 'Here she is — Miss America'. I was mortified." nent by arguing that "persua- sion" is a better tool for improving the status of . women in health than "the . heavy artillery of federal mandates. "The federal government unfortunately h a s only t h e clumsiest sort of tools at its disposal to address this kind of a problem," said Veneman, domestic counselor to Vice President Rockefeller. A chart book distributed as a conference working document shows that while three of every four of the 4.2 mil- 1 i o n health service workers are women, most women are concentrated in the occupations of dental assistants, registered a n d practical nurses, dieticians, nurse and other health a'des, lab workers and therapists. THE H O U S t ON P O S T TUFSDAY. JUMP '7. im Infertility Ironically, the pill and the IUD,. popvular methods of preventing unwanted births, can sometimes stand in the way of wanted births later on. Some women, upon stopping the pill, find that their periods don't return or come very irregularly, indicating a disruption of normal ovulation. Most of these women, it turns out, had irregular menstrual cycles to begin with, and the cycle irregularity apparently was further aggravated by the pill. Such women are advised to avoid taking the pill if they expect to want children later. Even women who had a normal menstrual cycle before starting the pill might stop the pill for a month every two years to see if they ovulate and menstruate normally. The IUD increases a woman's IVATCfir.M: .ferry Henderson, pro- *£ gram manager for consumer affairs for ~ Ihe Food and Drug Administration in g Dallas, said that rtiethylstilbestrol o (DFS) is used by growers lo promote sf growth in cattle and sheep. It was ban- g# ned for this purpose by the FDA. hut the J & VS. Court of Appeals. District of Columbia, overturned this ruling in 1373. "It is possible that DFS will b g5 banned in the future, because it is a a Known cancer-causing agent," Henderson ^aid. A spokesman for a natural food distributor in Dallas said he sells meat that does not contain DFS to many Houston health food stores. "People may have to ask for this meal because often it is not displayed. It is sold in several varieties and is frozen," the spokesman said. Controls can work overtime Page 12, Section_7 Houston Chronicle Wednesday, August 17, chances of suffering a pelvic infection that may damage the tubes, and infertility experts recommend that women who have a history of pelvic infection should avoid using the IUD if they value their future fertility. To reduce the chances of tubal damage, all pelvic infections should be promptly treated with antibiotics. Abortion, too, may result in later infertility, although the chances of thir happening following a legal abortion are far less than when pregnancies were terminated in back alleys. Be tween 1 and 5 per cent of women devel op infections following abortion. Multi pie abortions or ones done late in the first three months of pregnancy may weaken the cervix (the mouth of the womb) and result in the miscarriages of future pregnancies.