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Houston Breakthrough, April 1979
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Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 24. April 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1319.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1979). Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 24. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1319

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 24, April 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1319.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, April 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 24
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_549aw.jpg
Transcript Open for Business BNT by Diane Harrington Early in January, three Houston women got together and formed their own company, which specializes in quality interior painting and wallpaper hanging. Janie Ballard, Shirley Neely and Jean Tissue call their company BNT. As Tissue put it, "The three of us got together, we had been doing work for friends, so it seemed a good idea to form a company and go at it like that." Neely got interested in painting about two and one half years ago when she began re-doing an old house she purchased in the Heights. She decided to get out and do something on her own and make money at it. About a year ago, Ballard started painting. "I was hanging wallpaper with my cousin for fun and decided I liked it. I left my office job and started to paint full time," she noted. "You can see the progress being made—it's fulfilling." According to Tissue, there was one other reason for her involvement. "We got tired of doing work for our friends for free," she said with a grin. The firm is trying hard to build a reputation for dependability and quality work. "Women are more particular in the job they do. . .more careful in painting around a window. . .they care more about how the job looks," Neely emphasized. Ballard added, "People are so used to contract people not showing up, one can get a good reputation and more jobs by being dependable. We will never make a contract we can't complete," she said. (L-R) JEAN TISSUE, SHIRLEY NEELY, and JANIE BALLARD "We need to meet some more people that can open doors for us—we want to expand beyond where we are now," Tissue noted. BNT offers free estimates and guarantees to be reliable, hang your wallpaper or paint your wall. They can be reached at 861-2211. Diane Harrington is editor of this feature page, Open for Business. Whistle During the past four months, Kiki Neumann and friend, Sharon Jacobs, have sold approximately 1,500 whistle kits at $2 each. The kit consists of a whistle and a booklet explaining what to do if attacked, with an emergency phone number list. Neumann started just last Thanksgiving with 200 kits. They were a good last-minute Christmas gift. Parents also bought them for their daughters going away to school. "From the feedback received since the beginning of the program, there is a need for the whistle in this community," stated Neumann. "People are opening up and telling me their personal experiences with rape and assault," she added. When Jacobs' sister was attacked recently, everything "got close to home, scary" and that spurred her on to get involved with the whistle project. Both women spoke of the difficulties they have encountered so far. Jacobs noted the frustration that people generally don't realize they need protection—that no one is immune to attack. "Men laugh at us and make funny jokes about it—think it's cute—not important." But the same men might turn around and buy one for their wives, Jacobs noted. Neumann, who is a consultant for a paper company by day, is looking for help to run the program. "We're looking for women who have resources (like nurses and night shift workers) who can contact other women and make them aware of the need for personal safety. We are very willing to negotiate on large orders," she added. Jacobs said the whistle's main appeal is for women, but it also comes in handy for joggers and senior citizens. Joggers can use the whistle for protection against H SHARON JACOBS and KIKI NEUMANN would-be muggers. Senior citizens living alone find it convenient in case of assault or injury in the home. The nickel-plated, brass whistles can be used against obscene phone calls, also. A sharp blast into the caller's ear is usually enough to discourage any future calls. Jacobs added, "I keep one by the bed so that if I hear someone breaking in, I can make enough noise to scare off the attacker." Kiki Neumann and Sharon Jacobs are not as much profit-minded as they are about getting their whistle made available to all Houstonians. Several bookstores stock them, including, The Bookstore, 1728 Bissonnet; Books Inc., 2620 West- heimer and B.D. & Daughter Bookstore, 1623 Westheimer. The kits are also available by mail for $2.00 postage paid to WHISTLE, P.O. Box 66815, Houston TX 77006. - D. H. IRAN continued from page 12 Women Fighters. Among other things, they are calling for equal pay for equal work and equality of social and economic laws. Both Ahia and Hormachea applaud the recent demonstrations. They say that the Ayatollah's Islamic government is only transitional. It is only "the first part of the revolution which will eventually bring about a social-democratic government," says Hormachea. "I believe," she says, "that the Ayatollah does not see a place for women outside the home. I also think that doors will slowly be closed to women in various jobs. But what makes me proud is that women were the first to question the Islamic government. In the days to come you will see more groups expressing their disillusion with the provisional govern ment." However, she adds, although the Ayatollah has some feudal beliefs, he also has many liberal and militant ideas. "He is responsive to the people," she points out. "Notice how he backed off and took back his edicts when the women demonstrated. His government, however, is not, and they have no real interest in involving women in the work force." For those reasons Ahia and Hormachea feel Millett's reference to Khomeini as a "male chauvinist pig," was another divisive element. "To women who idolize him," Hormachea says, "this is very destructive. It is his government that should be criticized and brought to an end. Not him—he serves a purpose." Many of the Iranian students in Houston have returned to Iran and within the next months many more will leave- including both Sadeghr and Ahia. Although Hormachea is not an Iranian, she has become so involved over the years that she may move to Iran and make it her permanent home. The returning students have many ideas but Hormachea believes that the majority of them have developed a great respect for women while studying overseas. "It is political awareness that has done it," she says. "While living in the U.S. they studied and discussed politics with women students and developed exchanges and relationships they could never have had at home. The political movement has liberated the women in Iran too—because women demonstrated right along with the men." Ahia and Hormachea believe that American feminists do have a role to play in the Iranian women's movement, as well as other world movements. But they must be careful not to impose their own standards on other countries. "People need to have the time to talk and argue their own problems out, without an imposed view," Ahia says. Above all, Ahia adds she would like American feminists to remember that "governments may change, but women will still be oppressed until power goes to the people. Women's liberation is an example of the freedom of the rest of country. If the women are oppressed, the country is too." Barbara Farrar Karkabi has lived and traveled in the Middle East and written extensively about the area and its women. Her articles have appeared in numerous international publications. The Village Cheese Shop DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED CHEESES GOURMET FOODS FINE WINES COOKWARE MARY ELLEN ALLEN (713) 527-0398 MON-SAT. 9-f 2484 BOLSOVER HOUSTON, TEXAS 77005 Iree pREqiMANCy TESTINq & 'iNfORMATiON 868^4485 24 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH APRIL 1979