Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough, April 1979
Page 23
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 23. April 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1318.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1979). Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 23. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1318

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 23, April 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1318.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, April 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 23
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_549av.jpg
Transcript is the cradle of careers" Juliette Gordon Low Founder (1912) Girl Scouts USA the Chicago council. Although the San Jacinto council does not have a similar program, the local council has a senior aid training program. Seniors, independent of their troops, contact a council representative about vocations of interest to them. A meeting is arranged where girls visit a veterinarian's office, for example, and then return later to volunteer, Pirnie said. Some credit the women's movement for the Girl Scouts' emphasis on career education. Others, like Knox, said, "Girl scouting has been innovating since 1912." Yet Kathleen Smythe, public relations director for the Chicago council, pointed out, "The women's movement is difficult to ignore. It has set up role models for young girls—now they see women as other than homemakers." "It's great to learn how to cook and sew, but there's more to being an adult woman than that," observed Elizabeth Zbinden, a campus Girl Scout at Northwestern University. "The women's movement has increased the scope of girl scouting a lot," she added. Two troop leaders, however, differ from their troop members. "No one in the troop seems too interested in career opportunities. I don't think they think that they will have to study how to support themselves-they have the idea that they will be supported," said Beverly Rosenthal, leader of Cadette troop no. 89 in Evanston, Illinois. "At their age, they're entirely wrapped up with curling irons, notebooks with stickers and writing on their hands," she added. "There's a national awareness of the women's movement, but not on the troop level," said Sally Stewart, leader of senior troop no. 200 of Winnetka, Illinois. "It's not something that bothers them. They're not carrying a torch," she added. Girl Scouts of the USA are involved in the women's movement to the extent that the national board endorsed the Equal Rights Amendment at its national convention in Washington, D.C. in 1975. "The national decision doesn't represent the views of all the councils," said Pirnie. "San Jacinto didn't feel it could take a stand on the issue because of the diversity of its scouts." Some councils reacted strongly against the endorsement. Some burned their uniforms and one troop in Michigan resigned from the organization because they believed the national board was "using scouts as political pawns in its push for the amendment." The national office in New York received 6,000 letters, telegrams and phone- calls, according to Knox. Some Right to Life groups thought that the Girl Scouts were approving of abortion, and one American Legion post even said that the scouts could no longer use their hall, he added. While the national board endorsed the ERA, they cannot lobby for it. "By then- bylaws, Girl Scouts have to be non-political," Pirnie said. The organization's only link with Capitol Hill is through Mary Frances Peters, who acts as a liaison between the federal government and national board by attending government meetings and projects that could affect girls' lives. She also alerts councils on upcoming legislation that could affect them. Religion has been just as controversial as politics for the Girl Scouts. In 1975J the Archdiocese of Philadelphia severed relations with the scouts because of a new program called To Be a Woman. The program included discussions on rape and sex education. One Catholic mother called a newspaper to complain that the Girl Scouts were promoting abortion. The story received national attention. Things became so delicate that the Girl Scouts released a statement saying it had not approved the program. The issue also brought into focus the entire question of the role of religion in the movement. Was the Girl Scouts USA to be an instrument for educating girls on morality? What institution in their lives is responsible for establishing these guidelines? The Catholics finally compromised in 1975 and formally agreed that the policy of Girl Scouts is "to encourage girls and help them, through their own programs, to become better members of their own religious groups and to respect the varying opinions and practices of its members in planning and conducting activities." Although the focus and emphasis of girl scouting has shifted from activities in the home and immediate community to exploring a wider world, membership has declined by 500,000 members since 1973 One news account attributes the decline in membership to increased violence in the camps, including reported rapes and kidnappings in Oklahoma and Florida, to a decline among volunteer leaders now that more women work outside the home and to the emergence of many co-ed groups oriented to some of the same things that scouts do. Despite the drop in membership the Girl Scouts organization remains the largest girls organization in the country. Membership is still open only to girls. At the 1975 convention in Washington, the 1,800 delegates voted overwhelmingly not to admit boys into the organization. Today 2,623,000 girls across the nation still adhere to the Girl Scout Promise and Law, recited solemnly while holding up three fingers on the right hand. The message and motto remain unchanged: Be Prepared. Connie Pryzant is a journalism student at Northwestern University and a former Girl Scout. ? **? • M Theresa Dl Menno April is national Girl Scout Month. Girl scouting programs are available to four age levels: Brownies (age 6-8), Juniors (age 9-11), Cadettes (age 12-14) and Seniors (age 15-17). Brownie Troop 1973 (above) are second and third graders in Leider Elementary School in the Cypress-Fairbanks District. Most of the girls are second generation scouts. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH APRIL 1979 23 \Ci