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Houston Breakthrough, April 1979
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Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 22. April 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1317.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1979). Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 22. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1317

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 22, April 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1317.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, April 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
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Title Page 22
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File Name femin_201109_549au.jpg
Transcript Women's Success Development Center Workshops For Women and an Ongoing Educational Program Wednesdays at 7:30 there is an ongoing Rap Session for women. Please call 840-9207 for reservations or information. Women's Success Development Center 4141 Southwest Freeway, Suite 415 Houston, Texas 77027 Helping Women Choose Growth, Again and Again. "Whenever we're out of the office, the Breakthrough phones are answered courteously and your messages are taken efficiently 24 hours a day by OF HOUSTON a woman owned business • CALL FORWARDING • RADIO PAGING • LIVE ANSWERING SERVICE central office 4215 Graustark northeast office 4215 Graustark southwest office 3221 Fondren west office Kin 691-2088 781-3413 111 ROBERTA K. TILUNGHAST, PRESIDENT Houston • Galveston • San Antonio • Corpus Christi Scouting by Connie Pryzant Back in October, 1913, The New York Times sponsored a contest for the most apt description of the "typical American girl." One New Yorker described her this way: "She is a strong, healthy, thoroughly wholesome young person, sweetly sympathetic, who looks you squarely in the eyes. She is almost the antithesis of the extravagant, tight or slash skirted little turkey trotter who constitutes such a large portion of Fifth Avenue and Broadway." "She is a nice, healthy thing. . .not inclined to think overmuch," observed one playwright, "and far more anxious to be told that her frock is 'perfectly sweet' by other girls than to be assured that she looks 'corking' by a man." ". . .The American girl is like the American skyscraper: she stands out against a clear atmosphere, straight and clean cut. She is a good girl," one contestant noted while a woman wrote: "I should say that almost any American girl could go out and make a living if she had to. Her education is of a more practical kind tnan that given foreign girls. Our women are very independent and self-reliant." Just a year earlier, Juliette Gordon Low had started the first girl scout troop in Savannah, Georgia. She borrowed the motto Be Prepared from the Boy Scouts, and urged her girls to prepare for careers that were slowly opening for women. "Juliette Low was a feminist. Her girl scout movement provided a real vehicle for women to do what they wanted—that was quite revolutionary for those times, (pre-World War I),"saidDonnie Pirnie, director of communications for the San Jacinto Girl Scouts of Houston. In How Girls Can Help Their Country, published in 1913, Low wrote: "The numbers of women who have taken up aviation proves that women's nerves are good enough for flying." Aviation, however, was still in its infancy. Most girls learned domestic duties. Low and her scouts offered other alternatives to girls of the early 1900's, among them life in the outdoors. They learned to swim, communicated through the Morse code and learned life-saving first aid techniques. Low believed that these developed skills could lead to lifelong interests. "Scouting is the cradle of careers. It is where careers are born. For instance, a girl tries bandaging. She finds she likes red cross work and she decides to study seri ously and become a hospital nurse. Or she is expert in signaling and the Morse code leads her to become a telegraph operator. Or she goes in for social service and gets a government job," said Low in a speech at Mercer College in 1924. In the silent movie Follow Me Girls, produced by the Girl Scouts USA, a scout signals with flags to a person on the other side of a small lake only to find that a telegraph operator has collapsed on the job. She swims to the other side, performs first-aid remedies on the operator, takes over the telegraph wire and sends out a plea for help. When the message returns with the line, "Who are you?" she replies: "I am just a Girl Scout." She's developed a better self-image over the years. Girl Scouts still sell cookies but they are also learning about marketing as they organize their door-to-door cookie drives. Last year Girl Scouts sold 84 million boxes of cookies at $1.25 to $1.50 per box. This year's goal is 90 million boxes. "Girl Scouting since 1912 has been showing girls (seven to 17) that they can do anything they want to and it's giving them the tools to make their own decisions," Pirnie said. The newest program offered by the national board is From Dreams to Reality, a "career awareness program that enables girls to work with women in business," said Richard Knox, director of public relations, at the national Girl Scout headquarters in New York City. The program, funded by the Office of Career Education, U.S. Office of Education, is intended to reduce sex stereotyped attitudes in career choices. One feature of the program is a series of vocational cards showing pictures of women and describing their work. The visual images provide role models for the girls, Pirnie said. "Through this program, local troop leaders can help the girls make contacts and learn more about careers," Knox said. The Chicago Council of the Girl Scouts started its own version of "Dreams to Reality," entitled Metro Magic, even before the national board announced is program. Chicago's senior troop no. 2001 has visited women employed in accounting and in advertising agencies. A council summer program includes trips to Illinois Bell to speak to women managers, to the Hyatt House to learn about hotel management and to a local cosmetic factory owned by a woman, according to Audrey Peeples, executive director of public relations for 22 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH APRIL 1979