Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough, April 1979
Page 19
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 19. April 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1314.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1979). Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 19. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1314

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 19, April 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1314.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, April 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 19
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_549ar.jpg
Transcript handle the competition. She's unstable. It's raging hormones. Must be that time of the month.' Meanwhile, the men pointing the finger are having that tightness in the chest. God, that must be frightening." Psychologist Nancy Gulanick agrees that expressing feelings on the job can be detrimental to career progress. "I wouldn't advise women to go up to coworkers and say, 'It's tough.' If you did that, you might be called weak, incompetent." Being cautious can go too far, though, she adds. Sometimes women are so used to needing to be good on the job, they can't let down and say they have doubts, even when it's appropriate. In learning to close up on the job, women can lose some of the valuable safety valves available to them. And this causes more stress. ly high stress threshold, unless it was approached in the right spirit. "I love my work," says Vogelfang. "Even though each assignment is potentially high stress, I feel like I've got the best of jobs!" Carson, who puts in ten-hour days, agrees. Also, says Selye, it's important to get rid of grudges and forget unpleasant incidents. "Nature gives even the most fortunate of us only a limited capital of energy to resist stress, and it would be silly to squander it on quite pointless anger or hatred," he says. STRESS: HOME & PERSONAL "If you could just have some little surprise coming out of the washing to choose constantly between friends and work. If you want to move up, you have to put the job first. It requires time, thought, dedication-and a flexible schedule." How is this conflict different for a man? Camp thinks that for men, work is "a valid excuse." For a woman, "it's like you've sold out when you spend all child, you're Good Mother, Good Wife, Good Housekeeper. That's on top of Good Daughter, Good Friend, Good Business Person. Depending on how you were reared and what your standards are, that can present a lot of stress." For TV anchor Jan Carson, it's a nagging at the back of her mind as she takes an all-day Saturday stained glass course nob«4y appreciates What y*n 4*> except tVt commercials. W<- cawi u^e- "the. -tlnirus \riemetr) ha>/e -ta«lVK«nally mse4 \o coo*, wv^ «Wes*. Oft. Cft * n «*weM^ sVi#nUer. .j<m 4**& A* ft «t w*rk. Although women encounter more stress on their way up, says U. S. News, they often can deal with stress more successfully because they're more willing to admit they have problems and need help. Often a man's ego won't let him do that. Let's not lose that ability, says Kelleher. We can use the things women have traditionally used to cope with stress. Cry. Cry on somebody's shoulder. Just don't do it at worlcT "We don't have to become like men to have the rights of men," Kelleher says. "As we take a place in society as competent persons with equal rights, the incidence of ulcers among women is increasing. We're giving up classic femininity. "After I got shingles," she says, "I slowed down-cancelled some out- of-town work, concentrated more on taking care of my needs. I still over- schedule myself sometimes, but I pick up on the cues much faster now." Nancy Gulanick has developed a support system that works for her-regular lunches with other colleagues and some serious talking in social or work gatherings. "I acknowledge what it's like for me and hear back, 'Yes.' " She suggests that you find help from women's groups, such as the National Association of Women Business Owners, exchange clubs, or trade organizations. Check journals and papers for special meetings of interest to women. And, she says, test out some peers carefully to see if you can safely vent some feelings to them. "Talk to someone about this article," she says. "See if they thought the same way you did about it." Listen to good models, and be one yourself, Gulanick says. "It's frustrating to hear a female professional who has made it talking like she hasn't had our kinds of difficulties. We compare and* think we shouldn't have any problems either. But we know we do. If we deny them, we get crazier. If we acknowledge them, we're weird." Dr. Hans Selye, who formulated the concept of stress about 40 years ago, emphasizes the importance of a positive work attitude for handling stress successfully. A favorable view of your work can turn stress into ewstress, positive stress, which places less demand on the body, he says. Long hours, intense work and a hectic schedule could probably not be endured, even by a person with a natural- machine," says Cora Bartholomew, mother of five. "But you know that what's coming out is what you put in. And the same clothes will be in there next week. Housewifery is monotony. And nobody really appreciates what you do, except in TV commercials. You can't even sit down and enjoy the fruits of your labor." Bartholomew thinks it might ^be easier if she had never worked outside, always stayed home like her mother, who was your time at the job." A surprising number of successful business women locate their primary stress in the personal arena. Some even re-evaluate priorities as a result. "I decided finally that work wasn't the be all and end all and that I owed more to myself," says one. "Now I emphasize other parts of my life. I've put my job, and myself, in perspective. Ironically, I got a better review after this decision. I do a better job." Young single women just starting out also know conflict between private and public life. Assistant City Attorney Chere D. Lott says, "Men feel that my job takes away from my availability to them. Some find this impossible to deal with, and then I can't deal with the relationship- and there goes another one! "Sometimes I wonder if an unknown career is worth the sacrifice. There aren't many models to see how it's going to be. It's not going to be the momma, daddy, and the kids that we all grew up with, and we're not sure how it's going to pan out. In a way, you're scared to let go of the old ideal. But having put in the time and effort to get where you are, you want to ride it out and see what happens." Pi«5^rfe%> wuvt be cxpret6*4 appf*priarteki. Wittier* -W( T* wwt -tiwe. 4ta\j expect eq\z\ "happy as a lark, baking the bread, doing her number." Chances are, the mother had stresses of her own. One 65-year-old mother of five remembers a typical afternoon of 25 years ago. Stopped by a traffic cop as she rushed one kid to a music lesson, she was panicked thinking about the irritated maestro pacing the studio, another child waiting for her to pick him up across town, and dinner burning on the stove at home. Most women today don't have an option. For seven out of ten working women, a job is a compelling necessity, according to the April 3 Women's Day analysis of federal statistics. More than half of the women in the country now have a job or are looking for one. Of these, three out of five are married, and almost half have children. "When you work outside, you're doing two jobs-eight hours in an office, eight at home," Bartholomew says. Texas Instruments Supervisor Cecile K. Camp says, "I grew up in a generation where it was important to achieve and do well. It gets harder and harder to balance that directive with other values and make my life meaningful. The strain is having Positive carry-over from work can make personal life easier. Film production professional Susan Vogelfang says that skills she has learned on the job help out across the board. Now she can refuse an offer for a date without rejecting the person or wasting either one's time. The pressure of stereotypes makes juggling work and home harder. "Many of us have six or eight roles going simultaneously," says Helen Copitka, Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles Commissioner. "When you're married with a instead of cleaning the house; for TV talk show host Warner Roberts, it's the necessity of having a show timed so that she can fix a good breakfast for her boys; for the medical student, it's going to the library, even though the baby's crying and her husband says, 'I thought we were going to be together'; for psychologist associate Carol Cossum, it's leaving her husband and two college- age sons for a temporary apartment so she can finish her dissertation. Many women today are postponing or bypassing parenthood. These women are smart enough to see they can't do it all, says Cossum, but they're still locked into a traditional concept of mothering. We're trained to nurture, to take care of others first, says psychologist Nancy Gulanick. So we feel guilty if we take time out for ourselves before we make everyone else okay. Working people, men and women, need a supportive back-up person—a "wife," says Gulanick. "I think a woman can have that, partly, if she can afford to pay for child care and cleaning services." "But even liberated," says full-time homemaker Carol Sarnace, "you just don't want to leave your sick child." "When UH assistant professor Sybil Estess cut her teaching schedule to part- time, she flirted with feeling guilty for keeping her household help. "I wondered if maybe I should clean, too, since I was making less," she says. "But I decided no. I have a PhD. I deserve it." Kick the habit of feeling incompetent if you don't do everything, says Gulanick. Delegate responsibilities-all the way. Don't ask your husband to help with the kids' homework, then check up Jater to see if they really got it. Focus on what you do well, not what needs to be done or needs to be done better, Gulanick says. We're trained to get approval; men to achieve. So we concentrate on what we did wrong. Instead, we should be proud of our choices. Remember that any issue that affects one family member affects all, says marriage, family and divorce therapist Nancy Potts. "If the woman takes a job, the whole family needs to work out new rules. That can help, especially when the husband believes in snaring household tasks, but in fact he doesn't do them." Too much self-sacrifice can be dangerous, says Dr. Hans Selye, head of the International Institute of Stress. Constantly putting other people's good Men -fee-l 4hari m j«b -take* away 4f»w nw an/aiUWlify i> -tlnew. ' *£?0«e +iin«| -this imp^sibk. 4» 4*f\ ymt>, &<A 4Wi I cantrcM wrth W .]Tela4««ri*hip - and -fWe. «ees art #tW *ne> / HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH APRIL 1979 tam WOT2U 19 81