Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough, April 1979
Page 10
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 10. April 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1306.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1979). Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 10. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1306

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 10, April 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1306.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, April 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 10
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_549aj.jpg
Transcript Do LJ & daughter a feminist store 1623 Westheimer Houston, TX 77006 (713) 529-3609 Monday-Friday 5 PM - 9 PM Saturday 10 AM-6 PM Cullen Women's Center ^ offers Pregnancy Testing Problem Pregnancy Counseling and information. Call 733-5421 Monday - Saturday 9-5 pm nepenthe silkscreen editions for edition printing prospectus write: nepenthe po box 565 bellaire texas 774Q1 graphic design a creative approach to commercial art opmiot{: How to lobby by Debra Danburg (713) 667-S103 Policy making, goal setting, and sharpening issue positions are the proper concerns of our feminist organizations. And we can be as democratic, as informal, and as non- hierarchial or as non-manipulative as is humanly possible in our internal deliberations. But if our group decision is to influence the legislative process, we must secure people who can play the "good ole' gals" game, and we must trust their judgement and cooperate with them to the fullest extent. We are not the average lobby, with the average lobbyists. Possibly 98 per cent of the influence peddlers who haunt the halls, restaurants, and bars of the Capitol are middle-aged men in three-piece suits and western boots. Many are former legislators, and most are being paid over $20,000 per client, with several accounts per session. Their idea of "grassroots support" is the $500 or $1,000 campaign contributions that their clients paid to each legislator. They would be embarrassed to ask for an appointment without the security of these "door-opening," attention-gaining contributions. By contrast, the public interest contact person . . . the "people's lobbyist," is often young, a woman, and outrageously underpaid. This one paid staff person is often required to train the hiring support groups in lobbying techniques, coordinate constituent response through the organizational "network," and choreograph all committee hearings which affect their organizations' interests. The most important resource available to a public-interest or an issue-oriented lobbyist is the people who support their issue(s). Without money and favors to attract a legislator's interest, the only remaining lever is popularity. Public opinion is an abstract commodity by comparison, but legislators can be made to respond to their constituents, provided that the pressure strategically placed on the official is in a manner which cannot be ignored or overshadowed. Knowing who needs pressure, when, and in what form is the most important function of the lobbyist. Targeting swing votes, focusing support energies, and providing "problem" legislators with just the right "excuse" to vote with us are the most important things our lobbyist can do. For all legislators to receive random letters is far less impressive and influential than to have the four "swing votes" on a critical committee receive all 2,000 pieces of mail on an issue. For that mail to be influential, it should be in the form of personal letters, especially when sent to one's own representative. The most ineffective thing that one can do to influence a legislator is to send him/her a random form letter or petition. Suggestions for an effective personal letter include: • State that you are a constituent/voter/ supporter (if true). • Cite specific bill numbers, so that staff members can better find and trace them. • Give personal examples and creative arguments that might lend new light to an old subject, but keep it short and concise. • Ask for a response. This insures that the letter will be read and filed. Make the responses available to your lobbyist when your correspondent is committed or remains a swing vote. % If you plan to visit your legislator, state your intentions. Another real attention getter is carefully timed and targeted telegrams. Few people can help but yield to the pressure of 50 to 75 telegrams from local constituents, especially when they all come the morning of the vote. A personal visit to the Capitol is best. It demonstrates dedication, and the sort of committment that is irresistable to most elected people. Clearly, anyone who would go to that trouble also stays abreast of issues, follows voting records, votes in almost all elections, and probably would be a likely volunteer in the future. Grassroots supporters can provide what no amount of lobbyists' money can buy, and that is dedication and fervent support. If you plan to visit the capitol, here are some tips to make your visit effective and positive. • Dress as if you were going to court or to a job interview. Your issue is more important to you than your freedom of attire. • Study the voting record of those whom you will visit. Be informed. • Be polite and friendly with administrative aides. They read your letters and are informed on the issues and their employer's position. If they like what you have to say, they can insure an audience with the elected official, and can even call him/her off the floor to meet you. They will communicate how well-informed and active you are. • Represent your organization, when possible. Go with the power and influence implied in the numbers of a well- informed membership. • Stick to your one issue. Do not allow a person to ignore you simply because you disagree on another unrelated or even collateral issue. Do not debate, argue, intimidate, or threaten. Do not get offended by ignorance on your issue, or by sexist language. The only way to handle such a comment without being detrimental to the primary goal of vote-securing is to politely and quickly change the subject. • Lobby with a realistic time frame. Often the time of a hearing changes. Be prepared. Be realistic. Plan an overnight stay in Austin. • Beyond a doubt, the most influential way to lobby is to produce personal visits by a major contributor, known campaign volunteer, or personal friend of the legislator. Naturally these people will just make more sense and seem more rational than others, because they have already established points of credibility and agreement. We must play by the rules. The "rules" represent 100 years of pink granite "good ole' boy" tradition that no one group or issue can topple in one legislative session. Remember, the rules are not the issue, the ISSUE is. Stay focused. Keep targeted. Subrogate all collateral concerns to the issue. We cannot fight on all fronts, if we want to win. Debra Danburg is a third-year law student and is currently in Austin serving her second legislative session as Administrative Aide to State Representative Ron Waters. Breakthrough welcomes your expression of opinion on issues of interest to our readers. Please send your Opinion (typed, double-spaced, maximum length 1000 words) to Breakthrough, P.O. Box 88072, Houston TX 77004. 10 1 i HOWSTtfS^AlCrHROUGH APRIL1979