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Houston Breakthrough, April 1979
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Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 8. April 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 10, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1304.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1979). Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1304

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 8, April 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 10, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1304.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, April 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 8
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File Name femin_201109_549ah.jpg
Transcript Loraine Elms CONTINUING / TEMPORARY PROFESSIONAL ASSISTANCE URBAN / REGIONAL PLANNING RESEARCH, CORPORATE PUBLIC AFFAIRS, ALTERNATIVE FUTURES METHODOLOGY, FORECASTING, REPORT WRITING , SCENARIOS, EDITING, LIBRARY RESEARCH 71 3 / 926-3084 71 3 / 921 -4446 2426 LIDSTONE HOUSTON, TEXAS 77023 Sca/ipe exclusive ±koEi rot rnsn ana vjomzn 5366 WT£S.£fz£im£t nouiion, tzxas, 62O.-4120 Barthelme-Moore Associates Advertising and Marketing a full-service advertising agency since 1960 Helen Moore Barthelme Odell Pauline Moore 1110 Lovett Blvd., Suite 100 Houston, Texas 77006 713/521-9214 hous'ov-kol'man n. 1. A woman-owned business specializing in quality graphics and printing. 2. A large red brick house in the heart of Montrose. - adj. Having many and varied features. - v. Producing design, illustration, camera work, printing and bindery. - adv. 1. To increase the client's business manifold. 2. To satisfy the client. House of Coleman 901 West Alabama -Houston 77006 -1713) 523-2521 Mexican national seeks U.S. asylum by Shirley Kowitz Women have taken the lead in an effort to win political asylum for Hector Marro- quin, a 25-year-old Mexican national who is accused of being a murderer and terrorist in his native land. In the U.S., Marroquin is an undocumented worker who faces deportation, a prospect which he and many others are convinced will cost him his life. Deportation hearings began April 3 at the Immigration and Naturalization Service (I.N.S.) in Houston with Margaret "Peggy" Winters acting as Marroquin's defense counsel. In an exclusive Breakthrough interview three women involved in the case, Jane Roland, National Director for the Defense of Hector Marroquin; Rosario Ibarra de Piedra, founder of the National Committee to Defend Political Prisoners, Fugitives and Exiles; and Delia Duarte, a co-leader with Ibarra de Piedra, talked of the upcoming trial and their conviction that the continuing struggle for human rights would suffer a great setback if Marroquin is forced to return to Mexico. "The case is airtight," Roland said, "but it is a precedent-setting case in that the United States has never granted political asylum to someone from a non-communist country." Marroquin's troubles began in his last year at the University of Nuevo Leon when he and three other politically active students, who had helped organize marches for democratic rights, were accused by Mexican officials of committing a terrorist assault, and the newspapers implicated him in a murder case. Two of the three accused were assassinated by police and the other kidnapped. Marroquin, after consulting with lawyers, decided to leave the country and crossed into the United States at Eagle Pass on April 9, 1974. Although he has worked in the United States for the past four and a half years, the Mexican government has also accused Marroquin of being wounded in a gun battle and participating in a guerilla raid in Monterrey. "Marroquin's employer will testify that he was at work here in Houston the day of the gun battle and we have medical records proving he was in a hip- to-toe cast at a Galveston hospital from an automobile accident the day of the guerilla raid," Roland said. Marroquin's list of supporters is long. Chief among them is Ibarra de Piedra who flew in from Monterrey to testify at the trial. Ibarra de Piedra spent most of her adult life making a home for her physician husband and their four children. Then, four years ago, her 21- year-old son Jesus was kidnapped by Mexican officials. She has not seen him since. After long months of talking to police chiefs, politicians and even the President of Mexico in an effort to find her son, Ibarra de Piedra founded the National Committee to Defend Political Prisoners, Fugitives, and Exiles, which is now the focal point of a campaign for nationwide political amnesty. "We have records on 451 persons in Mexico who have been 'kidnapped' and sent to military camps," Ibarra de Piedra said. "There is political repression in Mexico but no one hears about it here." In talking about her "mothers' movement" Ibarra de Piedra said that the government did not consider her efforts to mobilize the mothers of missing children a threat in the beginning. Now an internationally known figure, Ibarra de Piedra considers her chief protection to be the fact that she is well-known in the U.S. and other countries. "If we can win political asylum for Hector, then the political repression in Mexico will be publicly acknowledged and, perhaps, the government will consider granting asylum to all our children or at least giving them a fair trial," she said. The effort to win political asylum for Marroquin has been a long one, involving over two years work on the part of hundreds of defense committee volunteers. A rally at the University of Houston was attended by more than 200 persons Saturday, March 31. A picket at the I.N.S. was held the day the deportation hearing began on Tuesday, April 3. Leaflets and posters were distributed throughout the city. "The offers of support we have had is very gratifying," Roland said. "It has come from everywhere." The list of active supporters includes among others, Gloria Steinem, Edward Asner, Jules Feiffer, Kate Millett and U.S. Representatives Mickey Leland, John Conyers and Ronald V. Dellum. "Gertrude Barnstone of the Women's Equity Action League has been a tremendous help," Roland added. "The hearing is different from other court cases because in any appeals process no new evidence can be added. The I.N.S. judge can end the hearing at any time, so it is important that all of our defense witnesses get to testify. Because of the public interest that has been shown, I feel that we will get a full hearing," she explained. Roland said that if they do not win the hearing, they would appeal to the immigration courts and then to the federal courts, if necessary. Among those scheduled to testify are Robert -Goldman, Dean of the American University Law School and the author of a report issued by the International League for Human Rights detailing repression in Mexico. Amnesty International has presented a statement for the hearing and the National Education Association is sending an official to testify. Several victims of torture in Mexico will also attend. When asked how Marroquin felt about the fact that women are in the forefront leading his struggle, Roland smiled and replied, "He has stated that he is very grateful for the women who have fought for him." "If we win this case, it opens the door of political asylum to be granted to victims in Chili, Venezuela, Haiti and other repressive non-communist regimes," Roland said. "It would be a victory for human rights." Shirley Kowitz is a freelance writer and a reporter for the Fort Bend Mirror. { , .HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH APRIL 1979