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Houston Breakthrough, April 1979
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Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 7. April 1979. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1303.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1979). Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1303

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, April 1979 - Page 7, April 1979, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1324/show/1303.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, April 1979
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date April 1979
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_549ag.jpg
Transcript me to be starting out on another career path. Even though I felt I was doing a good job, I'm not that secure a person that I do not question myself." Her 2-4 p.m. time slot on KTRH is now filled by a man-and-woman team of "marriage, family and divorce counsellors" on a program called Guideline. Callers are asked to identify themselves by age and a first name. The station has been preparing the changeover since last January. There is a disclaimer aired several times daily on KTRH: "The opinions expressed on KTRH throughout the broadcast day are not necessarily those of the station management or KTRH advertisers." Not necessarily, but KTRH seems to be working on it. Several movie critics are offering scripts for sale to the very producers and directors whose films they review," claims Jeanie Kasindorf in an article published in New West and New York magazines (March 19). "The result is that some critics have developed so many personal alliances that readers of film criticism in America may soon need a chart to tell them when a critic is reviewing a potential business partner or a best friend." Kasindorf cites these, and several other, examples: "At Time magazine, Jay Cocks tried for at least two years to sell screenplays to studio executives whose films he was reviewing. Last year, editors at Time left Cocks's name off a cover story on a Paramount film (Saturday Night Fever). Cocks wrote the story the same month he was negotiating to sell a screenplay to Paramount. "At Newsweek magazine, Charles Michener wrote a cover story on his friend Robert Altman's film Nashville. Several months later, Altman, as a wedding gift to Michener, helped pay for a trip for Michener and his fiancee to the Calgary, Alberta set of Buffalo Bill and the Indians. "At New West magazine, Stephen Farber singled out his friend Philip Kaufman for praise as 'one of our most talented unknown directors' without mentioning the fact that Kaufman had helped Farber try to sell his screenplays." Paul Zimmerman is a former critic who, during his five years at Newsweek, tried to sell two screenplays. Now a screenwriter, Zimmerman admits that he suggested a screenplay to producer David Picker while conducting a Newsweek interview. Zimmerman argues that he did nothing wrong. "You shouldn't be forbidden from approaching people," he says. He admits that friends talked him out of his objection to Alan Pakula's Parallax View. "If I didn't have a project with Pa- kula I would have been harder to talk out of it." Kasindorf points out that many film critics have abstained from reviewing the films of people with whom they are working. "Often this practice simply means a critic can avoid having to pan a future business partner's film." So what are the answers? "Should critics avoid all friendships with people in the industry? Should they stop reviewing the films of their friends? Should they stop reviewing films the day they start trying to sell a screenplay? If they acknowledge the connection, is it permissible to review the film of a potential business partner? In this complicated and incestuous world, are we to rely on the integrity of the critic alone? If so, why? "Until these issues are decided, film critics will continue to tell you that the one standard you can count on is: Trust me. In the incestuous world of film critics and filmmakers, they insist, they are the ones you can count on to act with integrity." New York movie critic David Denby devoted his entire column the next week to "an answer and some amplification" of Kasindorfs investigative piece. Unfortunately, his answer wasn't an answer. "I find it impossible to give a definitive answer to the issues Kasindorf raises. Yes, it would be best for critics to stop reviewing movies as soon as they begin to market their screenplays, but if they write their reviews with scrupulous honesty, I see nothing inherently corrupt in their continuing." Nor did his "amplification" amplify much, except his pomposity. "The job (movie criticism) requires people with the strength and shrewdness to avoid compromising themselves." Denby reasons that the more harsh a reviewer, the less the possibility of corruption. He quotes a Variety survey that showed Paul Zimmerman the toughest of the 26 critics rated. "While Zimmerman was trying to sell his screenplays all over Hollywood, he was also panning Hollywood's most commercial pictures. How corrupt could he have been?" Jay Cock s finished ninth in that poll, "so how corrupt could he have been?" Denby the film critic concludes with a romantic salute to the film critic as screenplay writer: "A few critics do remain independent, upholding the tattered honor of the profession, and if they were to write screenplays, they could probably do a lot better than the authors of most of the movies we see now." Which leads straight back to Kasindorfs original premise: "Trust me" says the critic. Houston has amongst its many blessings, a mayor with the common touch, one who "eats at exclusive restaurants like Tony's or Rudi's, but will be just as apt to go to McDonald's or to Otto's Barbecue or John's Barbecue. . ." Reporter Tom Kennedy (Houston Post March 11) paints such a wholesome picture of Mayor Jim McConn that one is tempted to look for the "paid political advertisement" at the bottom of the page. The story, ostensibly about Doyal LeCour and J. C. Mosier, McConn's two bodyguards, opens "on a crisp Sunday morning last fall" when "the reverence of a church service was suddenly interrupted" by LeCour's beeper. "Tiptoeing out of the Baptist church" LeCour reached a phone and learned there had been a threat on the mayor's life. LeCour says he doesn't understand why anyone would want to shoot at a mayor who seemed to get favorable reactions from a majority of people . . . whether at a black-tie banquet at the River Oaks Country Club or downing hot- dogs at James Coney Island. Either McConn or reporter Kennedy has a food fixation. As well as the aforementioned Tony's, Rudi's, McDonald's, Otto's Barbecue, John's Barbecue, River Oaks Country Club and James Coney Island, we follow McConn and his bodyguards to the Avalon Drug Store (where a 12-year-old boy . . . "couldn't believe that the mayor eats at places where everybody else does,") and to the Avenue Grill for breakfast with police chief Harry Caldwell. LeCour, who describes McConn as a down-to-earth family man, more like a friend than a boss, also worked as a mayoral guard for Fred Hofheinz. He recalls that Hofheinz had many speaking engagements, but rarely stopped to eat hamburgers and barbecue at out-of-the-way places like his successor. The bodyguards say that McConn's toughest questioners are elementary and junior high school students. City Hall reporters, take note. Breakthrough editor Gabrielle Cosgriff has a close relationship with the English language-she used to sell Encyclopedia Britannica in the Australian outback. Jan Carson Houston's Choice for News. 5 and 6 p.m. Eyewitness News The original FRESH pasta Italian Ristorante & Gourmet Salad Bar Invites all interested in supporting the ERA amendment to come and dine with Ms. Bette Otero, owner and manager, Sunday, April 22 thru Thursday, April 26 and for all who so designate, the price they pay for their dinner will be donated in support of the ERA. To accomodate more people for this event GIGOLO's will be open from noon Sunday, April 22 until 10 p.m. - Monday thru Thursday, 6-11 p.m. Last year $1500 was raised in five days and hundreds were turned away. So, in order to make this year's drive even more successful, I ask that as soon as you have finished dining, please relinquish your table so that more may be served. Lingering and visiting with friends pre-, vented hundreds from being served and consequently, less money was raised than could have been for this worthy cause. Please call 783-1053 for reservations as early as possible! Yours in Sisterhood, !^t6 a.dfc* P.S. For other occasions, I invite all women's groups and organizations to call for special rates for dining at GIGOLO's or for catering (of any types of food). Special arrangements can be made for luncheons also, as we are normally open only evenings, seven nights a week. 2730 Hillcroft Houston, Texas after 3 p.m. call 783-1053 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH APRIL 1979