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Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 7, December 1976
Page 8
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Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 7, December 1976 - Page 8. December 1976. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1255/show/1250.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1976). Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 7, December 1976 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1255/show/1250

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 7, December 1976 - Page 8, December 1976, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1255/show/1250.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Pointblank Times, Vol. 2, No. 7, December 1976
Date December 1976
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbianism--United States--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ75 .P64
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767189~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_421h.jpg
Transcript TV review the War Widow Homosexuality is bursting out all over the TV screen. For the most part, the image being presented is a positive one for gays. Best of all, no stereotypes. But it's still a man's world. TV remains a barren wasteland for the lesbian—except for the refreshing oasis of a program entitled "The War Widow" which aired October 28 and 30 on Channel 8's Visions. The show was produced by Barbara Schultz, and it was excellent. It is the story of Amy, a lovely young woman whose husband is away fighting in Europe during World War I. She has a daughter named Beth and they live with Amy's mother. Amy is unhappy, drifting without purpose, lonely, isolated from life. Then she meets Jenny, a professional photographer, and they become friends. From that point, the story becomes a natural unfolding of love between the two women. I won't describe the plot for I don't want to spoil it for you in the event it is re-run again in the future. But the story of Amy and Jenny is beautifully warm and tender. I watched as their love grew, and felt such a sense of familiarity, for it was the kind of love I could identify with. I was especially moved when Jenny tells Amy she loves and wants her. I understood Amy's struggle to acknowledge to herself her own deep love for Jenny, and I applauded her when she tells her mother: "I love Jenny. I love her tenderness; I love her body next to mine." I deplored the unfair and ugly reality that forces Amy to choose between her daughter and the woman she loves. As Amy says to Jenny in the final scene: "None of it is ever easy, is it?" But Jenny finds the strength to love Amy without pressuring her, and Amy finds the courage to claim her happiness. I thought the story and characterizations were very true to life. Amy, who appears initially as a delicate upper-class housewife, comes to realize through her growing intimacy with Jenny that it is with Jenny that she can be a whole person. "I don't want to live life through someone else," she declares. I was pleasantly surprised that the author refrained from the stereotyped roles we have grown accustomed to on the screen. The love between Amy and Jenny develops naturally. The physical expression of love is limited to tender touching and holding—no screen kisses on the mouth. However, Amy's love-making to Jenny's hand during a fireplace scene the evening after Jenny's declaration of love is symbolic of the intimacy they share. "The War Widow" makes statements about women's oppression, women's isolation, and women's place in society as well as dealing with the obstacles that confront lesbian women. It's a story of pain and joy, sleep and awakening, apathy and action, acceptance and overcoming. It's how we live daily. - Phyllis Yarnold