Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 10, [No. 4], April 1982
Page 4
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 10, [No. 4], April 1982 - Page 4. April 1982. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1197/show/1193.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1982). NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 10, [No. 4], April 1982 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1197/show/1193

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 10, [No. 4], April 1982 - Page 4, April 1982, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1197/show/1193.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title NOW News Bay Area Chapter, Vol. 10, [No. 4], April 1982
Publisher National Organization for Women, Bay Area Chapter
Date April 1982
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women
  • Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .N682
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332563~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_251d.jpg
Transcript MARY TYLER MOORE IN ORDINARY PEOPLE FA YE DUN A WAY IN MOMMIEDEAREST The roles 'movie mommies' play As deptcted on the silver screen, "movie mommies" are becoming more selfish, neglectful and abusive, a trend which could have an adverse effect on society's attitude toward working mothers, according to an article in Working Mother magazine's March issue. "Movies, whatever else they are, are a telling social barometer, registering change in our culture's attitudes and values," the magazine says. The magazine traced the recent "bad mother" trend beginning with 1979's Kramer vs. Kramer, in which a mother, who leaves her child to find herself, is seen as "completely dispensible." In 1980, Ordinary People depicted a cold mother who, unable to respond to her family's needs, finally leaves her husband and son. And the "baddest mother of thern all, the very mother who is every child's nightmare," was the subject of 1981's Mommie Dearest Citing the strong, self-sacrificing, traditional "good mother" of films such as A Tree Grows in Brooklyn and The Grapes of Wrath, the magazine asserted that "she has been replaced by the ne glectful and selfish, cruel and destructive Bad *• Mother. These new mothers are not just bad, they are getting worse." "Kramer vs. Kramer and Mommie Dearest strongly suggest an angry response on society's , », part to the working mother," the magazine said. • , "All three films certainly seem to point to strong .» feminist backlash, a desire to put women in general and mothers in particular back in their place —» ./- preferably their old-fashioned, domestic, self-sacri- < ficingone." A recent trend in custody decisions that no long- : er automatically awards the child to the mother < .- puts fathers into a new maternal stance, which is - reflected in a film like Kramer vs. Kramer, but, Working Mother warned that such films can also be effective catalysts in swinging the pendulum to another extreme. "Divorce courts are deciding more and more often against the working mother," "x the magazine noted. "The Bad Mother on screen, even when shrieking 'No wire hangers . . . ever!' J' is no laughing matter. To all mothers out there, she should be a matter of grave concern." Women still trail men s in earnings, study says WASHINGTON (AP) — Median weekly earnings of women were much lower than those of men doing essentially the same work in many occupations last year, the Labor Department reported Saturday. Although women held 90.6 percent of the bookkeeping jobs, for instance, they earned an average of $98 a week less than men holding the same job, according to a study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. THE STUDY, WHICH FOCUSED on 100 occupations employing at least 50,000 people, did not ascribe the wide disparities to sex discrimination or any other factor. It said only the "earnings of women were gen- eraly much lower than those of men." Karen Nussbaum, executive director of Working Women, an organization of 2,000 women office workers, said the figures supply new evidence of discrimination in the workplace. ''President Reagan says we don't need the ERA because we have all the laws we need on the books," she said. "But all you have to do is look at these figures to see that women don't have equality. There is no excuse for this. "THE SOLUTIONS HAVE GOT to be women organizing in the workplace to hold employers accountable, because clearly the government isn^t doing the job." Nancy Rytina, a BLS employment analyst, said "these ratios are pretty consistent with what has been reported over a long period of time. . . . They are not startling or new." She said various factors, such as the size of a company and the salaries it pays, have an impact on employee earnings. She added, though, "a large chunk of the wage gap remains unexplained." Among the earnings comparisons listed in the survey were these: ■ Male administrators of elementary and secondary schools earned an average of $520 a week, compared to $363 for women. ■ Male computer systems analysts got average weekly pay totaling $546, while their female counterparts earned a weekly average of $420. ■ Although women held 68.5 percent of the health technician jobs in hospitals and clinics, they earned an average weekly wage of $273, compared with $324 for men doing the same work. ■ Female elementary school teachers earned an average $68 a week less than males, even though women held 82.2 percent of those jobs. ■ Men who work sales counters, except for those in food establishments, earned an average $240 a week while women, who held 76.2 percent of such jobs, got $195. ■ In a survey of which jobs paid best for men and women, the bureau said seven of the 20 best-paying occupations for males were in the engineering field, where median weekly earnings ranged from $507 for civil engineers to $619 for aerospace engineers. Occupations in the educational field offered the most money for women, with median weekly earnings averaging $363 for female school administrators and $336 for vocational and educational counselors. The National Research Council, in a three-year study submitted in September to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, said women are paid less than 60 cents for every dollar paid to men. That study said, though, a host of traditional work force patterns — not necessarily sex discrimination — accounted for the wide disparities. The 96-page report said women continue to be paid less than men, in part "because of trie subtle ways the job market and wage structures concentrate women in low-paying jobs." Singer joins fight, Singer Connie Francis s^ys she will help Grant County, Wis., voters with a recall campaign against a judge who referred to a 5-year-oid rape victim as "sexually promiscuous. ' Francis, awarded $2 million in a civil suit stemming from a 1974 rape at a motel in Westbury, N.Y., has spoken to congressional committees and made public-service TV spots about sexual assault. She said she would appear March 17 in Lancaster if recall petitioners will make arrangements for her to perform and speak. The petitioners' target is Judge William Reinecke. AGEISM Ever been told you couldn't do something because of your age? Ever been told you had to do a certain thing, since you were of a certain age? If so, and the age in question was arbitrary, you were a victim of stereotypical thinking and blatant AGEISM, If you would like to contribute comments, information, or . ideas for the Hay program on AGEISM, call Evie Whitsett at 488-1777 after 7 P.M. weekdays, early A.M. weekends. WANTED TO BUY Used Refrigerator, dinette set, lawn- mower. Call 4834546 (work) or 996-1482 (home) and ask for Mary or Susan Skinner. DON'T FORGET! BAYNOW's Program Meeting this Thurs. April 1, 7:30'p.m. at A Uniting Church Women's Week at UH/CLC this week, March 29 to April 2. BAYNOW's Business Meeting on Wed., April 21 at Pat's, 2002 Richvale, 7:30 p.m.