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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
Page 21
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 21. March 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 10, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1184.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1978). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 21. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1184

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 21, March 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 10, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1184.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date March 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Item Description
Title Page 21
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File Name femin_201109_538t.jpg
Transcript Jack hath not Jill in "Love's labour's Lost" By Beth Rigel Daugherty Never before have so many women been involved with the annual Baker College Shakespearean production at Rice University. They are working in all areas of the play —set crew, costumes, acting, administration and directing for Love's Labour's Lost. The direction of the play is set by the producer, Stephanie Shine, an undergraduate at Rice University. She chose the director for the production, a woman, and is responsible for bringing and keeping the company together and managing the business and publicity details. "I enjoy coordinating, putting things together, calling people to do things and then seeing those things actually done," Shine said. The director, Thad Logan, also feels the creative power of causing something to happen. "I have a vision of a play in my head and it's exciting to translate that vision into reality," said the director, a graduate student in English at Rice. Filled with mockery and wit, Love's Labour's Lost wraps its message in a world of fun. The lords woo the ladies with jewels and fine words. With "taffeta phrases, "The theatre I do tends to be leftist in that it's not elitist. You can't do Shakespeare just for English professors who know the plays by heart." Thad Logan, director Love's Labour's Lost silken terms, precise" and "golden cadence" they try to seduce the ladies into a world where language can transform anything. The play is about pleasure and the dangers and delights of lives lived under pleasure's banner. Within such a framework, Shakespeare examines romantic and married love, the use and abuse of language, reality and fantasy. "Critics often interpret the play as a conversion of the lords to the ladies' reality principle, but the values placed on reality and fantasy in the play elude easy classification," Logan said. In Love's Labour's Lost, the female characters dominate much of the plot as well as the outcome. Logan said Shakespeare "seems aware of what we'd call feminist concerns." And in this comedy, the women reject the usual conclusion -they tell the lords to forget about marriage, at least for a year. To this, one of the lords, Berowne, responds, "Our wooing doth not end like an old play. Jack hath not Jill." Shakespeare's women are strong, competent and intelligent. They work together without being competitive or feeling threatened; they are self-sufficient and understand business; they have energy and wit; they enjoy the company of the lords, but they do not need men. They question the conventions of romantic love and the sexual games the lords play. The women are so much stronger than the men they may seem very rude, Logan said. "But the women are only rude be cause of the arrogant assumptions by the men." The women in the play function as a group but they are also individuals. The princess is the leader, she decides the course of action. Rosaline, played by Yvonne Leach, often scoffs at the men by ridiculing Berowne's conceit. Katarine, played by Nancy Packer, sometimes takes a little longer to fully realize what is happening. Maria does not deride the men so thoroughly perhaps because she wants marriage more than the others. But she does not want marriage at any price and so makes demands of her lord. "A play potentially widens the audience's vision but language is only one means to reach that potential," said Logan. Since the language of a Shakespearean play can become a barrier to understanding, the presentation of Love's Labour's Lost assumes an added importance. For Logan, two things help surmount this barrier: the development of a stage language and an implicit permission among the actors and directors to innovate in a cooperative atmosphere. "The theatre I do tends to be leftist in that it's not elitist," said Logan. "You can't do Shakespeare just for English professors who know the plays by heart." Some people think a Shakespearean production is successful if the actors stand in the theatre and say the lines beautifully. Not Thad Logan. She is keeping the integrity of the ideas and language, with all their complexities, but her play is not dependent on the words for the outcome of the production. For her, staging a play involves finding a stage language that is more visual. She believes the play communicates experience, new ways of seeing things, rather than just ideas. Shakespeare's plays are popular because he reaches all kinds of people, Logan said, not just those who are classically trained. There is something special about a Baker College production and Logan welcomes it. The actors do not have to make money, they have a long time to rehearse and neither their egos nor their careers are on the line. Therefore, everyone has a chance to try something, to suggest, to create. But more important, Logan said, the players have the freedom to fail, giving them the freedom to learn what works and what does not. Have there been any problems because she is a woman director? • "I feel androgynous when I'm directing —it's wonderful.I get on stage and demonstrate what I want. I am constantly switching back and forth between male and female roles. As a result, I become unconscious of the limitations put on either sex. I forget sex roles, though not sexuality. It's as though both sexes are accessible to me. Because of this, the actors respond to me as androgynous and I think that's why I haven't had trouble." Marilyn Marshall Jones Page 20 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH March 1978