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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
Page 19
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 19. March 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1182.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1978). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 19. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1182

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 19, March 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1182.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date March 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 19
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_538r.jpg
Transcript Violence begins at home By Kathleen Williamson ** '^rm^ DR. TOBY MYERS and KAREN HOWES COLEMAN DESMOND E. GAY JUDGE HARRIS COUNTY CRIMINAL COURT AT LAW NO. 6 • MEMBER STATE BAR OF TEXAS • PRACTICING ATTORNEY FOR 25 YEARS • TRIED CASES IN ALL STATE AND FEDERAL COURTS % ENDORSED BY NORTH HOUSTON LAWYERS ASSOCIATION PAID FOR BY COMMITTEE TO ELECT DESMOND E. GAY, JUDGE P. DOWNING, CHAIRMAN Page 18 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH March 1978 On a national average, some woman is beaten by her husband every 30 seconds. At least one woman in every four has been assaulted by her spouse. Out of 129 homicides in Harris County last year, 32 occured in marital disputes. Houston's Crisis Hotline received 614 calls from battered women in October 1977 and the number of these calls is increasing. These disturbing statistics were presented January 28 at a workshop on battered women sponsored by the Texas Research Institute for Mental Sciences in conjunction with the Coalition for Abused Women and the Houston Area Women's Center. Liz Waugh, Supervisor of Emergency Social Services at Ben Taub Hospital, became alerted to the problem of spouse-abuse after seeing women come to the emergency 'room time after time until they were brought in D.O.A. She noticed what studies have confirmed, that the beatings increase in frequency and severity with time. "The beatings are horrible and the damage is permanent. We've seen blindness, paraplegia, baldness where hair was torn from the scalp, torture to the breasts and stand violence in the family." A study that may go far toward pinpointing both causes and solutions for conjugal violence is being conducted at the T.R.I.M.S. Marriage and Family Clinic by Karen Howes Coleman, M.Ed. The research begun by Coleman last spring differs from prior studies in that all of the men and women coming into the Marriage and Family Clinic complete a questionnaire and undergo psychological testing. In this way, those persons involved in conjugal violence may be compared with a control group who are not. Also, for the first time, the men who commit acts of violence are being questioned directly to determine their attitudes and feelings. The widely held belief in "victim pre- cipitation"-that the victim provokes and is responsible for violent acts-has already been challenged by findings that 71 out of 100 women report no argument prior to the beatings and 73 per cent offer no physical resistance when assaulted. One question that perplexes many who try to aid abused women is, "Why do women stay with their attackers?". Toby Myers listed reasons given by the women themselves: fear of reprisal; passive acceptance stemming from low self-esteem; shame "The beatings are horrible and the damage is permanent. We've seen torture and rape with everything from a Coke bottle to a hot curling iron." Liz Waugh Supervisor, Emergency Social Services Ben Taub Hospital genitals and rape with everything from a Coke bottle to a hot curling iron." Toby Myers, Ed.D., of T.R.I.M.S. and the Coalition for Abused Women spoke of the current interest in the phenomenon of "wife-beating" as evidenced by magazine articles, television programs and a spate of recently published books. That wife battering has become a social issue arousing international intere?* can be largely credited to the efforts of Erin Pizzey, of London, England. In 1971, aware of the isolation suffered by married women in trouble, she founded what became the first battered wives center, Chiswick Women's Aid. In 1974 Pizzey published Scream Quietly or the Neighbors Will Hear, the first book on the subject of battered wives. By 1975, the National Organization for Women proclaimed marital violence a major social issue and established a National Task Force on Battered Women/Household Violence. Past President of the National Council on Family Relations Murray A. Straus has stated, "I don't think we are going to understand violence in American society until we under- at their failure to keep marriage and family together; lack of support from law enforcement and social agencies; and, finally, no place to go. What prompts these women to leave? They may flee in absolute fear of their lives or because their children are being abused or because they have been helped to realize their alternatives. At present, Houston has no shelter for abused women. The Coalition for Abused Women is seeking funding to open and maintain a twenty -four hour emergency residential and counseling center. For now, information on social services available to abused women is being furnished by Crisis Hotline to its callers at 228-1505. Battered women and their spouses are encouraged to apply to T.R.I.M.S. Marriage and Family. Clinic for counseling. The clinic holds a group session for battered women one evening a week. Women who wish to prosecute their attackers may seek help from the Victim Assistance Program of the Harris County District Attorney's office.