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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
Page 18
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 18. March 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 18, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1181.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1978). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 18. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1181

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 18, March 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 18, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1181.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date March 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 18
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_538q.jpg
Transcript Know your health history Marrie RichardsMD I wonder how often the patients who depend on me realize how dependent I am on them? Physicians use many tools to diagnose diseases and to learn more about their patients. But none is more important than the history the patient gives of her present complaint, past medical problems and family history. I also need pertinent information about her job, smoking or drinking habits and general lifestyle. The best physical exam, lab tests and x-rays are all of secondary importance. The human body and mind are incredibly wonderful and complicated. A pain here or a funny feeling there can be the symptoms of many different problems. Medicine is truly an art and not a science —we deal much more in grays than in black and white. Last week a woman came into the office complaining of lower abdominal pain which had persisted for quite some time. I asked questions like, "What makes it feel worse?", "Does it occur at the same time every day, or every month?", "Does the "I really like to deal with whole people, not just sore toes." pain make you nauseated?". Unable to answer this type of question, she said, "I don't know. It just hurts and I want to get rid of it." The patient had no abnormal findings on physical exam, was not acutely ill and felt she could live with the pain a bit longer. So I sent her home with instructions to keep a diary of when the pain r upgrade with on the job training SER Jobs for Progress V 250 W. 19th Street 868-1144 tors ask everyone the same types of questions. Knowing what you will be asked and thinking about your answers before your appointment really can be helpful. First, know why you are there. Pinpoint your problem and try to describe symptoms as specifically as you can. (Sometimes this is not possible.) If you are apt to forget something, write it down. Don't hold something back because you think it's "dumb" or not relevant. If a problem concerns you, you should mention it. Often, your doctor will guide you by asking appropriate questions, but you can also guide the doctor with your own observations. Anytime you see a new doctor, you will be asked for some general information. This includes a past history of medical problems, surgeries and hospitalizations. When did you have your gall bladder "Medicine is truly an art and not a science." came on, how it felt and whether it was related to meals or menstrual function. When she returns we can use her observations to try to find out what is wrong. We lost a week and the office visit was much less productive than it could have been. But the alternatives meant giving her some medication and hoping the pain would go away, or beginning a series of expensive, and probably unnecessary, lab tests and x-rays. It's possible that we may use some of these tests later, but given an accurate history, many procedures can be eliminated. We each know more about our own bodies and emotions than anyone else. We may not know the name of the muscle we pull, but only we know how it feels, what makes it hurt more and what eases the pain. Obtaining medical histories from patients is a structured process; hence doc- out? Why did you have exploratory abdominal surgery? Was your appendix removed at that time? With people moving about more and seeing many different doctors, it is imperative that patients know what type of procedure or surgery they are having and why it is necessary. Also, information about how long you have had high blood pressure, or whether you had rheumatic fever as a child, is very important. Family history is also relevant. A breast lump in a 30-year-old woman may be approached rather conservatively. . .unless her sister died of breast cancer at age 36. The review of systems is the next part of a complete history. This is a general screen for problems in specific body systems (cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, or reproductive). For a woman, gynecological history is especially important. The date of her last menstrual period, the regularity of her periods, the age she began menstruating, and the type of contraception she has used are all pertinent to her present state of health As an example, consider the case of a woman who is having difficulty getting pregnant. She began menstruating when she was 15, but her periods were very irregular until she began taking the pill. She has recently gone off the pill but cannot get pregnant. Her infertility could be related to a problem she had as a teenager. It may relate to birth control pill use. Or it may be something resulting from the frequent vaginal infections she had in college. A good history is the single best way to approach such a difficult problem. I have to mention another thing about gynecological histories. I cannot even estimate the number of women I have seen who have had Caesarian sections but don't know the reason. Many women have also had hysterectomies and don't know why they were performed or which organs were removed. It is more than your right to know.. .it is your duty. This same rule of individual responsibility is true of the medications you take. You should know exactly what you are taking, why, how much, and how long you have been on any medication. Also know which medicines you cannot take because of allergy and how the allergy manifests itself. You may not think that facts about your personal life are relevant to your sore foot. But your general pace of life, your smoking and drinking habits and the pills you take are all important to your physical health, and they reveal something about you as a person. This kind of information can also pinpoint possible future problems which may be prevented. I really like to deal with wnole people, not ju_i sore toes. Elect Louis Moore 263rd. District Judge Evaluated as "Qualified" to serve as Judge By Judicial Evaluation Committee of the Houston Bar Association — 1975 First, Second or Third Choice for Judge By Houston Bar Association, Harris County Suburban Lawyers Association and Houston Lawyers Association — 1972 26 years legal experience — Good reputation Respected hard working trial and appellate lawyer Member: American Bar Association, Texas Bar Association, Houston Bar Association, Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, Association of Trial Lawyers of America and Houston Trial Lawyers Association. Served on HBA Judiciary Committee, Bylaws Committee, Bar Candidate Committee and Lawyer Referral Service Committee — Recent award for exceptional service in 1977. Outstanding record for community service. Former board member Houston Association of Children with Learning Disabilities — Greater Houston Chapter, National Society of Autistic Children — Legal advisor and Board Member of Planned Parenthood of Houston (1971-73) recipient of the Margaret Sanger Certificate of Appreciation, Planned Parenthood Federation of America in 1972 — Inspector of Elections for Harris County. 56 years old — married — 4 children — active in church work and Scouting. Navy Fighter Pilot, World War II Competent, Conscientious, Concerned, Fair, Dedicated. Pol. Adv paid for by Dorthy Curlee on behalf of Louis Moore, 400 Houston Bar Center Bldg., Houston, Tx. 77002, Bertrand Moser, Campaign Treasurer. March 1978 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH Page 17