Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
Page 12
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 12. March 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1176.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1978). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 12. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1176

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 12, March 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1176.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date March 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 12
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_538l.jpg
Transcript The Breakthrough Review Choosing someone to review a book is a little like matchmaking. You look for compatible backgrounds, philosophies and interests, but you also look for those essential differences in points of view that will make the pursuit lively and challenging. Sometimes a book comes in and a certain critic immediately comes to mind. Sometimes you bring together what seems a compatible pair and wind up with quite a clash between reviewer and book. And sometimes the books and reviewers simply find each other. With a stack of books and a handful of potential reviewers, Breakthrough began its literary matchmaking. Anita Davidson stumbled on an obscure, but important, book and brought it to our attention. The book is Rosalind Franklin and DNA. Davidson found Anne Sayre's book in the library while investigating topics for a term paper in her cell biology course at the University Without Walls. Currently a fine arts major at the university, Davidson wrote her paper on a comparison of Sayre's book and Watson's The Double Helix. From Davidson's research we have a revealing portrait of a fine scientist and the suppression of her contributions to DNA research. i Turnabout, a book about women and alcoholism, is reviewed by Elnora Mendias, a registered nurse and a family nurse clinician. Mendias' work in psychiatric nursing and her experience with alcoholic patients made her especially qualified to review Turnabout. Since most of her experience has been with male alcoholics, she is also in a position to compare a new recovery program which focuses on women alcoholics with traditional programs geared toward men. Beth Riegel Daugherty seemed equally suited to Applesauce. Daugherty is a PhD candidate in English at Rice University and is writing her thesis on the works of Virginia Woolf. Since Applesauce has been compared to Woolf's Orlando, Daugherty's expertise with this kind of novel made her an appropriate critic. And I, Marianne Warfield Kostakis, was intrigued by June Singer's "new theory of sexuality" in Androgyny. Singer's theory is founded on the psychological principles of Carl G. Jung. I have a long-standing interest in Jungian psychology and my undergraduate thesis studied Jung's perspective of women and the feminine principle in T. S. Eliot's poetry. I'm currently an instructor in English at The University of Texas Health Science Center. —M.W.K. Androgyny by June Singer, PhD Anchor/Doubleday, 1976. 371 pages. $3.95 paper. By Marianne Warfield Kostakis Proposing a new theory of sexuality is an ambitious undertaking, particulaly because Freudian thought has dominated psychoanalysis in this country for nearly a century. June Singer has taken bold steps toward a new theory of sexuality in her exploration of the archetype of androgyny. A student of Carl G. Jung and a practicing psychoanalyst, Dr. Singer begins her search for a new understanding of sexuality with the premise that androgyny is a universal and collective image of wholeness inherent in the human psyche, an image of the two in one, the idea of the male and female joined within one being. It originated with the earliest civilizations, but by 2000 B. C. it was being suppressed by emerging patriarchal societies, and was all but expunged from Judeo-Christian tradition. As a result, modern civilization has become polarized with all things feminine suppressed in male-dominated societies. On a personal level the human psyche has been polarized, with the male ignorant or afraid of the feminine within himself and the female equally pressured to suppress the masculine within her psyche. Singer foresees a new Age of Androgyny, an age in which men and women will return to the state of the "uncarved block," that original state of wholeness before a wedge was driven between the masculine and feminine. As a student of Jungian psychology, Singer assimilates Jung's teachings, comes to terms with his weaknesses, and moves beyond them to new knowledge of the human psyche. Jung was headed in the right direction, no doubt, in his separation of the concepts of sex and gender, in his ability to view masculine apart from male- ness and feminine apart from femaleness, and in his identification of these masculine and feminine qualities in men and women Loretta Standard continued on P 14 March 1978 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH Page 11