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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
Page 11
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 11. March 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1175.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1978). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 11. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1175

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 11, March 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1175.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date March 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 11
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_538k.jpg
Transcript • *vN__Lk J VI, •3 K. i: 4 * '. ;'\^ Roses story —Loretta Standard By Carol Bartholdi About 6:30 one night last November, a 17-year-old Houston high-school girl was attacked and raped as she walked to her home in the Rice University area. Rose was relatively lucky, though. She was not killed or seriously injured. And a few weeks later, she identified her attacker and called police in time to catch him. The man Rose says raped her was arrested and charged last month. Bond originally was set at $20,000, then it was reduced to $10,000. Finally, within 24 hours, he was released on his own recognizance. Rose recently told Breakthrough of her feelings and thoughts concerning the crime of rape and her own traumatic experience. At her request, Breakthrough is using the name Rose. "I was very paranoid that night," she said, "I saw two men who appeared to be following me. They were whistling at me and that kind of stuff. I began walking faster and I kept them in mind." The two men eventually turned down another street and Rose felt more at ease. She came to a corner across from the Rice University campus and had to stop to wait for cars to pass. "On the other side of the street, when I looked to the left, a man was standing on the corner. He did not really seem to be looking at me, so I did not really worry. "While I was waiting for the cars to go by I decided to cut through campus, because of all things, I thought it would be safer than walking down a dark tree-lined street." The man, who was in his late twenties, crossed the street and began heading in the same direction as Rose. "When I saw we were walking in the same direction, I knew he was going to attack me. But he began to go in another direction and my defenses went down. He said, "Hi," and I said, "Hi," and then he jumped on me and hit me on the back of the neck." Rose said the man grabbed her around the neck, told her "Shut your mouth!" and pulled her into the bushes. "He tried to knock me out, I think, but I was not unconscious," Rose said. "Down with 'em!" he ordered, referring to her pants. Rose said she tried everything she could to outwit the man during the next 20 minutes. When she screamed, he Learn Self-Sufficiency in a Wilderness Environment mountain, river, or desert OUTBACK EXPEDITIONS P. O. BOX 444, AUSTIN, TEXAS 78767 1401 NEWTON STREET 512/442-8036 Page 10 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH March 1978 slapped her and he kept his hands wrapped tightly around her neck. She said he repeatedly told her that he would break her neck. Rose said survival was her only thought. "It is amazing what goes through your mind when you are in such a situation," Rose said. "You realize that your mind stores everything somewhere. A string of knowledge comes to you-I remembered an article I had read two years before in Cosmopolitan about how to say 'no' to a rapist and survive." During those 20 minutes, Rose said she talked often, but that the man said little. She told him she did not have any contraceptive, that they could go to her house which was not far away. "To me my house meant lights, people and traffic. "At one point, I said I was scared that I would get pregnant. He said, 'I'm scared too, because they'll put me in a penitentiary."' Rose told him she was not a virgin, then she told him she was a virgin. "Don't say you are a virgin," Rose said. "That is a rapist's dream. What better thing than to defile a person and have it be her first time? What could be better? "I asked him if he would do this to his sister or mother and he told me to shut up. He did not listen and he did not want to be manipulated. A rapist is degrading you to bring himself up. He wanted everything that he could make me give him," she said. During 20 minutes, Rose said the man raped her twice, forced her to have oral sex with him, threatened her life and left. As he walked away he looked back at her and said, "I'll find you again." "After the rape," Rose said, "I got dressed, but I could not find my shoes anywhere. I was still not sure the guy had left. He might have been hiding in the bushes. I started walking out of the bushes and I saw a woman walking her dog. I yelled to her and she did not hear me. I yelled that I had been raped. The more the woman did not see me, the more desperate I felt. I ran towards her, and-how was she to know I was not a rapist-she sicked her dog on me." The rest of the evening was spent filing reports with the Rice Campus Security and the police department and being treated at Hermann Hospital. At 2 a.m. she began a two-hour therapy session. During the following two months, Rose thought she saw her assailant on the street several times. "The police have been wonderful," she said. "I had had a couple of false alarms when I thought I had seen the guy. One time I was sure I had seen him just a few blocks from my neighborhood. I waited until I was at school, until almost two hours had passed before I called the police. They sent someone out who took me back. We looked for him—but we could not find him. The policeman told me that if I ever saw him again to go to the first place I could and make a phone call to the police department." Two months later, Rose was driving home at about 5:30 p.m. and she saw the man who had raped her standing at a bus stop. She drove by another time to make sure he was the one. "He was even wearing the very same clothes he had worn that night," she said. She stopped at a nearby house, asked to use the phone and called the police. Rose had looked at mug shots but never was absolutely sure if the pictures matched the person. "Intellectually you can look at mug shots and not realize which was him," she said. "But when you see him in person, your body remembers. When I saw him at the bus stop, I had the same feeling I had when he hit me. It was exactly like something hit me. It was a gut reaction, the feeling was the same." "Every minute I took calling the police meant that he might get on a bus and get away," Rose said. When she had finished calling three different police departments and walked outside, there were five squad cars at the bus stop, Rose said. She said she walked up to the man and laughed. "It was a very satisfying feeling," Rose said. "I felt a surge of anger, but it was scary because I was confronted with the whole experience again. "I was scared, angry, happy, nervous and desperate all at the same time." What Rose did not know was the man would be back on the streets the very next day. When Breakthrough went to press, the man was out of jail on bond, his trial date pending.