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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 9. March 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 6, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1173.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1978). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 9. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1173

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 9, March 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 6, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1173.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date March 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 9
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File Name femin_201109_538i.jpg
Transcript neon sketches By Mary Ross Rhyne JAN BEAUBOEUF (left) discusses the installation of her show, Neon Sketches with gallery owner Roberto Molina What do the glow ot a sunset and the glare of a doughnut shop have in common? Light—the chosen medium of sculptor Jan Beauboeuf. When you walk into her exhibit at Roberto Molina's second-floor gallery on University Boulevard, you're surrounded by delicately worked tubes of neon glowing and —reflecting off richly-painted walls. It's an environment of light in forms chosen to suggest landscapes of the southwest, executed in beautifully combined colors of suggestive effect. The cool tones of lightning and the warm glow of clouds remind us of the impact of light on our emotions, and focus our response to the characteristics of different colors and intensities. Artist Beauboeufs interest in neon grew out of her work in photography. Frustrated by the flatness of the photographic image, she began experimenting with three-dimensional effects, mounting photographs on plexiglas with light behind them. In 1970 an artist friend in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, suggested that the neon sign company she worked for execute some pieces in neon glass. These samples solved the problem of a two-dimensional medium but presented the new problem of working with commercial mass-production companies which were not interested in individual projects and would produce them only at extravagant cost. For a while Beauboeuf substituted cheaper incandescent lighting in pieces made of acrylic tubes and plexiglas rods, enclosed in plexiglas boxes. These pieces —in which the amount and color of light could be regulated by filters-were immediately popular, as viewers responded to the natural effect of organic shapes bathed in a glow of light. The very first piece sold went to a New Orleans lawyer who specialized in ACLU work. Other pieces were bought by fashion executive Luciana Avedon and New Orleans gallery director Barbara Muniot. Simonne Stern, owner of a New Orleans art gallery, encouraged Beauboeuf, buying her work and showing it in the gallery. But with Stern's death the contemporary art scene suffered a setback in New Orleans. As John Bullard, director of the Art Museum of New Orleans, which recently housed the Tutankhamen exhibition, commented, "It just isn't the same in New Orleans without Simonne." So Beauboeuf moved to Texas—a new magnet for artists who like the climate and the can-do atmosphere. Working with several neon crafters in the Houston area, Beauboeuf returned to her original medium to express her interest in three- dimensional light. Recent work ranges from textured, shaped plexiglas in realistic shapes such as cactus (lit by neon) to plexiglas canvases behind abstract landscapes of neon shapes. Some of the latter are on view now at the Made in Houston show at Louisiana Gallery. The environment at Molina's gallery represents Beauboeufs desire to use light to create an atmosphere and visual impact consistent with the architecture of a given space. Her work can be designed for a tiny living room or a hotel lobby-anywhere that light and color are appropriate. She still makes pieces using her prized hoard of antique neon, colors that are no longer being manufactured, such as the candlelight glass commissioned by the old Balinese Room in Galveston to flatter the faces of dining ladies. As supplies of these old colors are exhausted, new colors will take their places, such as the neoclassical blue which shares space at Molina's with the antique cobalt blue. The excitement of working with neon is multiplied by the changing effects of colors in combination with each other and with the unexpected blend of modern technology and aesthetic effect. Wires and transformers are part of the medium and, although they can be totally concealed, Beauboeuf prefers to let them show, since they are an integral part of the medium. A native of Marksville, Louisiana, Beauboeuf has a master's degree in speech and drama and was a debate coach at Memphis State University and the University of Alabama before turning to art. "I left teaching when I got tired of training future governors of Alabama to lie effectively in public." Active in civil rights groups in Louisiana, she is a member of the Houston chapter of the Women's Caucus for Art. "Even though individual women may make it in the art world, they are exceptions, and it doesn't change the fact that museums and galleries promote almost entirely the work of men," Beauboeuf ^_aid emphatically. "If women can band together in a group that includes successful as well as unknown artists, they have a chance to point out to the community how little work by women is exhibited in galleries or in the museums supported by public funds." Unintimidated by technical or political difficulties, Jan Beauboeuf is here to stay. Hre-iq/p's Clolhinc) & Cdlec[ible$ Jmm^ 15% off with this ad ^(W.iqth 868-3P5. B jgfce a safari in awareness with the feminist owned sexual awareness studio. A source of up-to-date products, information, and workshops to enhance sexual awareness, freedom & independence. 2004-1/2 GUADALUPE 512-472-6828 AUSTIN, TEXAS 78705 Hours: Wed. - Sat. 11-6 GROWTH STUDIO hous'ov'kol'man n. 1. A woman-owned business specializing in quality graphics and printing. 2. A large red brick house in the heart of Montrose. - adj. Having many and varied features. - v. Producing design, illustration, camera work, printing and bindery. - adv. 1. To increase the client's business manifold. 2. To satisfy the client. House of Coleman 901 West Alabama • Houston 77006 • i 713) 523-2521 Page 8 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH March 1978