Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
Page 8
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 8. March 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1172.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1978). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1172

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 8, March 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1172.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date March 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_538h.jpg
Transcript TO RECONCiliAT'lON WOODY ALLEN "Annie Hall" very strong parts for the two women. My reservation about it is, on the one hand, it's the same old thing saying you can't have both career and family when, in fact, a lot of ballerinas do have both. But what was good was that you felt that the career had been very satisfying; you didn't get the message that you used to get in Hollywood movies that it would all turn to ashes in your mouth if you didn't have a man and a family. And Julia, again, there're two women who are not defined by men. What was "What's interesting about films now is that it's suddenly all right to be alone at the end, like in Annie Hall. Even the most hopelessly romantic people accepted that ending." disappointing in that film was that they couldn't really depart from the Lillian Hellman text. They only had that one scene together and it was wonderful. That scene where Jane Fonda and Vanessa Redgrave are adults and meet in that cafe at the train; you just wanted more of that; you wanted more exploration of that relationship. I think The Mary Tyler Moore Show was exciting as far as the relationships with women were concerned. In the old days when Phyllis and Rhoda were still on, they were so successful they had to spin off on their own and they never were as good apart as they were together. Lightman: Who would you like to see win this year's Oscar for Best Actress? Haskell: Well, I thought Diane Keaton was great in Annie Hall, but I thought she was even just sublime and extraordinary in Looking For Mr. Good bar. I hope she gets it and I think she probably will, but because of both of those films. Even though they won't give her a nomination for Mr. Good bar, that will be the reason she gets it. Lightman: Why didn't they nominate her for Mr. Goodbarl Haskell: Well, because they don't approve of that film. It's too salacious, it's just too raunchy for Hollywood. People who have said we want films that deal with adult subjects and suddenly see something like that, they can't bear it. They can't bear to see Diane Keaton...beautiful Diane Keaton ...in that very sordid context. I know a lot of women who just couldn't face it, and yet it has a lot to do with all the preachings about liberation and the idea of taking charge of your own life and getting all you can-all sort of cosmopolitan and feminist mystique. Jill Clay burgh is like this in An Unmarried Woman. Everybody had been raving about her, but I never had felt that strongly about her until this. And she's just spectacular. The same with Diane Keaton; I loved her in Annie Hall, but never expected she could do anything but play herself until I saw her in Mr. Good- bar. To me, that was really the performance of the year. Haskell: There's a fantastic...we 11 not fantastic... I don't want to create too great expectations...but there is a new film by Gunnel Lindblom, who was the Bergman actress in The Silence. She's directed her first film and it's really quite remarkable. It's called Summer Paradise. It's very much about women, four generations of wo men-virtually a matriarchy. The men have all sort of disappeared. It's not a problematic film at all; it's not didactic in the way *Agnes Varda's film was. It's about women's relationships but in a very rich novelistic way. That's exciting. Joan Silver, who did Hester Street and Between The Lines, is very good. Most of the others are European. There's Anja Breien who did Wives. Joan Tewkesbury is apparently going to direct a film. She's the Alt man screenwriter. MARSHA MASON (right) and QUINN CUMMINGS 'The Goodbye Girl" SHIRLEY MacLAINE (left) and ANN BANCROFT 'The Turning Point" "....Goodbye Girl is a hit because it's back to the 50's...It's the woman who's the old doormat. When a man comes into her life, she lights up, when he leaves, she mopes around..." I loved Shirley MacLaine better than I've liked her in a long time in The Turning Point. There was something so quiet and solid in that performance. Lightman: Was The Turning Point really the "woman's film" they sold it as? Haskell: It was a bit of everything. They were trying to cover too many bases. They were trying to promote ballet with Middle America, which is a fine thing to do, I'm sure. It was really two films that didn't quite fit together. It didn't really give you enough information about the two women. I don't look for Herbert Ross to be the great women's director of the future. He's lucked in here with a few good people and successful commercial properties, but I don't think he's got any real feeling for it. Lightman: Could you give us some fine women directors to watch out for? Yes, we shall see. You can't necessarily hope for great women's parts from women either, because Elaine May did that dreadful thing with Peter Falk and John Gassavettes, and Joan Darling did First Love, which is completely sympathetic to the man. Here's what I'm saying: in this sense the biggest problem is women's distrust of each other and their natural inclination to gravitate to the man. Lina Wert-' muller is another example of a woman who is completely man-oriented. I think there will probably be better women's films from men than from women because the women who make it are very often men-oriented women. I think we just have to cross our fingers and hope. The great thing is that there are numbers there. Quantity is very important and at some point the quality will take care of itself. March 1978 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH Page 7