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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
Page 6
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 6. March 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1170.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1978). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1170

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 6, March 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1170.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date March 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_538f.jpg
Transcript for office? "Women still have to run harder and faster than any man," Bresenhan says. "A man can run part-time. A woman has to run full-time." Women have to spend more time campaigning because so much time is run and lose and build positive name identification but women run a much greater risk of being labeled "losers." "I haven't quite figured that one out yet, but it's true." Gerhardt said. "Take Frances Farenthold. Twice she lost for "I think a lot of women are apprehensive about running. It's always been a man's field, so they don't run." - Joyce Cragg consumed convincing people that they really are "serious, viable" candidates. As Pool explains, "Everybody wants to know if you're really serious-especially the politicians. They don't ask a man if he's serious." That word "serious" is one Kathy Whitmire heard many times during her race last year for city controller. She managed to convince enough people she was indeed serious and thus became the first woman ever elected to city-wide office in Houston. "I hate to see people get into a race if they have committments to their jobs or families or whatever that will keep them from being able to run a serious campaign," Whitmire said. Whitmire hopes her election will make it easier for other women to be perceived as "serious" candidates with real victory potential. "People are reluctant to run if they don't stand a good chance to win," says Billie Carr. "Losing is not fun, and if it does not appear that a woman stands a reasonable chance from the outset, she's even more likely to lose. Everyone wants to back a winner." But is a loss at the polls always a loss? Carr is one who feels the name identification built up during a first unsuccessful race might well provide the key to winning the second or third time around. She is also an advocate of filing a woman in every open position "just so people get used to the fact that women's names are going to be there." But Joyce Cragg, who chairs the Harris County Women's Political Caucus, thinks women are better off not running unless they really know what they're doing or can command the financial resources to hire those who do. "If you don't have good organization in your campaign, you're going to fall on your face trying to run- unless you happen to luck out, and the luck of the Irish covers very few people." "A woman can't run and lose too many times." In the view of attorney Jo Ann Gerhardt, an unsuccessful candidate for the state legislature in 1974, men can "I believe women just can't survive too many defeats in the public's mind." — Jo Ann Gerhardt governor, so politically, I think in the minds of people she's dead, which is ridiculous. She's qualified, and she's got fantastic name identification, but I just believe women can't survive too many defeats in the public's mind." In any event, Gerhardt says her one defeat does not mean she's giving up. "I'm going to run, and I'm going to win." Lack of political experience among women is a major factor in preventing them from acquiring the experience, adds Joyce Cragg. "I think a lot of women are apprehensive about running-feeling they don't have the political background or the expertise and so they don't run. It's always been a man's field, so therefore, they're very hesitant about running." If there is one piece of advice all women in pohtics apparently agree on, it is to urge women to get first-hand experience and knowledge through someone else's race before trying one themselves. The Women's Political Caucus is trying to provide an additional training ground, as well as candidate recruitment and grooming. The knowledge is there for the taking. "I just wish we had more answers as to why there aren't more women candidates." Carr said. "I guess it's a shortcoming of the women's movement." Not all is bleak however. Cragg points out four of the ten women running for office locally are running for judgeships. Others are running for the state legislature, county clerk, state board of education and for county chair of the Democratic party. Statewide, she says, there are quite a few women running. The caucus is active in recruiting and supporting female candidates. Whitmire's election as city controller is expected to provide a lot of encouragement. She is among the many who hope the ballot two and four years from now will list many more women's names. "I hope so," Whitmire says "but if we don't do something towards developing those women (early), there may not be any." neon sketches JAN BEAUBOEUF marchl4-apriH4 Showing at Roberto Molina, Inc. 2437 Vz University Blvd. Houston, Texas 77005 713-522-2358 - Gallery Hours - Tuesday-Saturday Noon-5 p.m. Thursday til 9 p.m. Closed Sunday & Monday Breakthrough Political Poll WHAT QUESTIONS DO YOU WANT THE POLITICAL CANDIDATES TO ANSWER? Ninety-four percent of you voted in the last election, according to our reader survey. You carry a lot of clout politically. Therefore, we feel a responsibility to let you know where the candidates stand on issues that are important to you. You can help us inform you by letting us know what these issues are. Next month's Breakthrough will focus on the May primary elections. We will carry news stories on candidates in key contested races and their responses to your questions. It's going to be a long ballot, so you'll want to be an informed voter on the following races: U. S. Senator U. S. Representative Governor Lt. Governor Attorney General State Treasurer State Senator State Representative State Board of Education County Judge District Clerk County Treasurer County Commissioner County Party Chair Help! There are 126 candidates for 72 state and local judgeships. Fewer than 50 percent of those who go to the polls vote in judicial races. These are the judges you face in divorce trials, child custody hearings and rape cases. We will publish first-person accounts from individuals and attorneys (names withheld on request) of legal experiences with incumbent judges. For example, one of pur readers was told by her attorney during her recent divorce trial, "Forget it. Don't contest anything. I checked the docket and you have Judge Wells Stewart.. . " Breakthrough's policy is not to endorse candidates,but rather to inform our readers where candidates stand on women's issues. We believe you can make up your own mind on how to vote. Help our reporters research their stories. Send your questions and comments today to: Houston Breakthrough, May Primary, P. O. Box 88072, Houston, TX. 77004. March 1978 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH Page 5