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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 3. March 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1167.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1978). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 3. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1167

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 3, March 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1167.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date March 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 3
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File Name femin_201109_538c.jpg
Transcript maury forman Abortion Abortion is an emotionally packed issue where there is no such word as compromise. Congress has now succeeded in doing what it does so well-it has arrived at a compromise on this issue that pleases neither side. ...None of the funds provided for in this paragraph shall be used to perform abortions except where the life of the mother would be endangered if the fetus were carried to term; or except for such medical procedures necessary for the victims of rape or incest, when such rape or incest has been reported promptly to a law enforcement agency or public health service; or except in those instances where severe and long lasting physical health damage to the mother would result if the pregnancy were carried to term when so determined by two physicians. Nor are payments prohibited for drugs or devices to prevent implantation of the fertilized ovum, or for medical procedures necessary for the termination of an ectopic pregnancy. Pro-abortionists look at the issue in a legal context while anti-abortionists continue to debate the moral context. The compromise Congress has reached defines morality only for a certain class while ignoring the legal definition. Briefly, the well-known arguments are presented thus: pro- abortionists see the 1973 Supreme Court ruling allowing legalized elective abortions as a constitutional right. They argue that however abominable abortions are to some people, the courts say that they are an acceptable form of health care in our society. To deny funds to a specific class of people is a let them eat cake attitude. In sum, what good is a constitutional right to a citizen who has no means of exercising it? On the other hand, anti-abortionists view conception as the beginning of human life. Even though a woman's body belongs to her and she has dominion over it, there is a second life involved. That developing form of life deserves the protection of our society. Is there not a moral obligation to the fetus child? To make matters worse, there is the problem of the issue being decided by the group best organized to get the votes, and not a majority of the people concerned. When that occurs, the j)oor will inevitably be the scapegoat. Unfortunately, a congressional delegate's interest is not how to decrease the amount of "destroyed fetuses" and "mutilated mothers," but rather how to avoid losing the support of their constituency-and the next election^ How many times have we heard newscasters speak of Congress not wanting to vote on an issue in an election year? Congress will delay voting on controversial measures, ignore facts and statistics, doubletalk the issues and contradict itself in voting. Henry Hyde, the author of the controversial amendment, said he is deeply committed to the sanctity of human life, yet he is on record as favoring capital punishment. In an interview he said, "You can think of capital punishment as an expression of reverence for human life. Murder, being the ultimate crime, demands the ultimate punishment." Some people can rationalize anything for a vote and a $57,000 annual salary. One final bit of irony exists for representatives making a decision on this issue. Congress has allowed civilian employees of the federal government and their dependants to receive indirect federal payments for abortion through federally financed insurance programs or Health Maintenance Organizations. The Pentagon's policy is that an abortion can be performed for medical reasons or for reasons involving mental health-a compromise that Congress rejects for poor women. Further, if the wife or daughter of any member of Congress needs an abortion, she is covered 100 percent under the federal employees' health insurance. This results in the taxpayers paying for abortions for a select few, while either by law or economic necessity, some of those taxpayers are denied the same. Why don't the constituents have the same right to this type of health care as their elected representatives? If members of Congress want to show their attitudes toward the Supreme Court order, they should begin by striking the provision for selective abortions from the health benefits they receive at the taxpayers' expense. A Health, Education and Welfare task force concluded in its report on alternatives to abortion "...the literal alternatives to it are suicide, motherhood, and, some would add, madness." Congress ignored this report. Legislation is supposed to deal with questions of equity, safety, health and due process. Instead, this amendment proposes that abortion is murder for those who cannot pay, but merely an ordinary medical procedure for those who can pay. As one political observer noted, "If philosophers and scientists differ, are politicians the ones to decide? Should we encourage a philosophical imperialism in the legislative branch. The guest editorial is by Maury Forman, a Medicaid examiner with HEW in Washington, D.C. writers £& stories Dorothy Terry 1 Maury Forman 2 Jan Harlan 3 Dixie Lee Hawkins 4 Victoria Hodge Lightman interviews Molly Haskell Mary Ross Rhyne 6 8 Carol Bartholdi 10 Marianne Warfield Kostakis 11 Anita Davidson and Kathleen Williamson Marianne Warfield Kostakis 15 16 Dr. Marrie Richards 17 Kathleen Williamson 18 Karey Bresenhan 19 Beth Rigel Daugherty 20 Cowboy's world, cowgirl's place Rodeo takes women for a ride Guest editorial: Abortion Congressional compromise pleases neither side Linda strikes out But not without a law suit Guess who's not running for office Women—that's who From reverence to rape to . . . reconciliation New York critic on new wave of the 70's Neon Sketches Artist Jan Beauboeuf illuminates Roberto Molina's Gallery this month Rose's story Rape in the afternoon The Breakthrough Review Special book review supplement How do you like your eggs? The traditional and the egg centric Motherhood (second in a series) The home birth of Nancy Kern's and Jim Asker's baby boy Know your health history Or how to be a good patient Violence begins at home TRIMS seminar on abused women Sew on and sew on "The Greatest Sew on Earth" comes to Houston Jack hath not Jill in Love's Labour's Lost "Taffeta phrases, silken terms" staff box Advertising Art Business Circulation Copy Editors Editorial Board Feature Editors Office Photographers Production Promotion Proofreading Typesetting Application Brandy Beach, Ailene English Gary Allison Morey, Loretta Standard, Mark Stinson, Kathleen Williamson Jody Blazek, Deborah Diamond Hicks Kathy Allen, Maxine Atlas, Deborah Diamond Hicks, Nancy Landau, Sharman Petri Carol Bacall, Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Cheryl Knott, Marianne Warfield Kostakis, Victoria Hodge Lightman, Red Zenger Janice Blue, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Marilyn Marshall Jones, Victoria Hodge Lightman, Kathleen Williamson Art-Anita Davidson; Books-Marianne Warfield Kostakis; Film-Victoria Hodge Lightman; Health-Dr. Marrie Richards; Poetry-Joannie Whitebird Maxine Atlas, Janice Blue, Sharman Petri Debbi DuBose, Janis Fowles, Frederick George, Marilyn Marshall Jones, Nancy Kern, Nancy Landau, Sharman Petri , Brenda Pope, F. Carter Smith, Totsie Janice Blue, Gail Brady, Rachel Burke, Gabrielle Cosgriff, Gary Allison Morey, Loretta Standard, Kathleen Williamson Ruth Barrett Gabrielle Cosgriff Victoria Hodge Lightman, Kathleen Williamson Rachel Burke, Cheryl Knott, Victoria Hodge Lightman, Lynne Mutchler to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Houston, Texas. Page 2 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH March 1978 Houston Breakthrough is published monthly (except for the bi-monthly issues of July-August and December- January) by the Breakthrough Publishing Company, 1708 Rosewood, Houston, TX 77004; P.O. Box 88072, Houston, TX 77004; Tel. 713/526-6686. Subscriptions are $5 per year, newsstand 50 cents per copy. This publication is on file at the International Women's History Archive in the Special Collections Library, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60201.