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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
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Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 2. March 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1166.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 1978). Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 2. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1166

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978 - Page 2, March 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1189/show/1166.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Breakthrough, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1978
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date March 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .B74
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 2
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  • image/jpeg
File Name femin_201109_538b.jpg
Transcript photos by Sharman Petri Cowboy's world, cowgirl's place By Dorothy Terry From a revolving stage in the Astrodome's center arena, Dolly Parton wailed to a packed crowd, "Jolene, please don't take my man. . .". In the chutes behind her, several young women walked their horses, oblivious of the blaring music, as they prepared to compete at barrel racing-the only rodeo competition open to women at the recent annual Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo, the largest and richest event of its kind in the world. Cowgirls are allowed to participate in the livestock show. "We want to keep our femininity," said Butch Bonine, northern regional director of the Girls' Rodeo Association (GRA). She has "no desire" to see women compete with men in other rodeo events. The GRA is the national organization that helps professional rodeo contestants enter national contests and keeps women informed of what's happening in rodeo throughout the country. GRA also sets standards and guidelines for Approved All Girl Rodeos. In these rodeos, women compete in all seven standard events: barrel racing, calf roping, bareback bronc riding, bull or steer riding, steer undecorating*, goat tying and team roping. "We're happy with what we have," Bonine said. "We don't want to compete with men in their events. If a woman were to compete against a man in bareback bronc riding or calf roping, it would "We've worked very hard to get what we have," she explained, "and we don't want to undo any of the good that we have accomplished. Our purpose is to promote women in sports and to better our own sport. "We do work to see that women get equal prize money for their events in the rodeo," she added. But some of the women feel the money situation is still unfair. "If you don't see many women out here, it's because they're back home milking the cows." show that women are not as physically strong as men. It would make us look less competent." "Likewise, we don't want men competing in the barrel racing event. It would detract from our glory," Bonine said. "The men don't compete with us and they don't detract from us as winners. It's our own championship." Adding a women's division to the national rodeos had been considered at one time, she said, but the idea was rejected by the Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association. One of the competitors, Vickie Hegar, who has been barrel racing for 15 years, said of the money problem, "It's bad. If the men get a top purse of $3,000, we get $600." "We're lucky to be here," she explained. "The men could care less about barrel racing or whether we're in the rodeo. The top purse money for the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo was the men's bull riding event at $16,500. The lowest purse for any men's event was $14,000. The top purse for barrel racing was $9J50. Money was not the big topic down in the chutes that afternoon. The small group of women was busy preparing their horses for the barrel races-the next to the last event of the rodeo. By that time, the crowd in the Dome had thinned. Many people left after Dolly Parton's performance. The women, dressed in traditional cowgirl garb of tight pants, western shirts, hats and boots, lined up at the gate and awaited their turn to compete. Connie Combs placed first in barrel racing that afternoon. She would advance to the finals that night. "I'm so excited and so proud of him," she said, patting her horse. Combs agreed with Bonine's view on competing with men in other rodeo events. "It's not feminine," she explained. Men greatly outnumbered women at the Houston rodeo. A woman rancher from Yukon, Okla. observed, "If you don't see many women out here, it's because they're back home milking the cows." ♦In steer undecorating, contestants must remove a cloth ribbon glued to the back of an active steer. March 1978 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH Page 1 *i