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The Wand, Vol. 5, No. 7, July 1989
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The Wand, Vol. 5, No. 7, July 1989 - Page 3. July 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1136/show/1129.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1989). The Wand, Vol. 5, No. 7, July 1989 - Page 3. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1136/show/1129

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Wand, Vol. 5, No. 7, July 1989 - Page 3, July 1989, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1136/show/1129.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Wand, Vol. 5, No. 7, July 1989
Publisher Womynspace
Date July 1989
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminists--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Lesbians--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location HQ1101 .W35
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3634790~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 3
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Transcript INTERNATIONAL FEMINIST ACTIVIST LOOKS AT CREATIVITY FOR SOCIAL CHANGE Spending time with Kari Anderson is synonymous with regenerating spiritual creativity for social change. She truly has the power of unlocking and unleashing female moral power in order to "bring it to bear on global, national, regional, local and personal issues ." Most of all she urges innovative ways to tackle both old and new problems that we face as individuals and as nations. Kari Anderson is the featured speaker at the Women's Group on July 9 where she will share her national and international experiences as a consultant to policymakers, as a catalyst to redefine and restructure development policies, and as a collaborator for cross-cultural organizational grass root initiatives. Kari Anderson may have stimulated grass-root initiatives, but she certainly is not allowing the grass to grow under her feet. In May 1989 she participated in an international workshop, "People's Initiatives to Over- Come Poverty" at the Institute of Culture and Communication Resource Systems in Honolulu, Hawaii. She acted as a representative in the capacity of co-program director of the Socio-Economic Policy and Forecasting Unit based in Thailand. What concerns Kari is not only material poverty across the world, but also the spiritual poverty that she has discovered among American women. As citizens of a nation that is a forerunner in technological advances, "we have not yet figured out how to tap our spiritual energies," she says. She herself is a living example of her emphatic philosophy that the individual makes a difference And that difference will make it possible to find "new directions for future responsibilities in protecting and nurturing the planet earth, " she explains. Since men have so woefully failed in this regard, women constitute the true powerhouses from which creative initiatives will spring and provide solutions to socioeconomic problems faced today. But in order for that to happen women must first tap the energies of their spirituality. Kari wants to create an international forum which would serve "to identify and reinforce certain values common to us all and realize the urgent need to cooperate rather than compete in our efforts to address a number of concerns which knows no borders, no gender, and cannot tolerate prejudices," she says. Her own "spiritual awakening" came as a result of being chosen to be an American exchange student in Thailand about ten years ago. As a teenager in a small community in Minnesota, Kari would have been satisfied to become a P.E. teacher and "have a garden". Her experiences showed her another garden that needed tilling and gave her the mandate to be what she is today and what she plans for herself tomorrow. Her first international encounter forced her to examine herself in a different light. What she found shocked her. She was embarrassingly ignorant not only about the rest of the world but also about her native country, the United States. She also discovered that "as Americans we are not living what our values are. " "We are clueless as to what we are doing internationally as well as nationally. We are ignorant in so many ways." In her opinion, such national and international illiteracy is disastrous given the present state of affairs in our localities, in our nation, and abroad. In a small school in Thailand, without the benefit of running water and air conditioning, without computers, Kari learned more about herself and her relationship to the world than she had ever learned. She came to realize why it is so important for ordinary citizens to become more aware of the effects American policy decisions are having globally. "Our planet can ill afford ignorance in such matters. It is not enough to know that we are a 'Great Nation'." In comparison to Third World counterparts, American women are far less informed about how policy decisions are made and what effect they have, according to Kari. She explains that ultimately there is a price to be paid for such ignorance. As womon "we must learn to think globally and act locally," is the message she wants to communicate to as many groups as possible across the world. Her own journey as an international feminist activist has taken her from being an active observer of the world to one who feels the urgency to jolt individuals and groups into creative action. And "jolt" is a word she uses often. She feels that "whatever topic we may choose individually as a vehicle, we need to use the opportunity to bring our local communities together while simulantaneously embracing with the global network." POST SCRIPT (from the writer of this article): And what does Kari do when she is not actively involved in a cooperative initiative abroad? She wears sunglasses with excerpts from news about political refugees (let her tell her own story of how she acquired them here in Houston). After interviewing Kari as I sped down a superhighway to get back home experiencing all the comforts our technology can offer in my airconditioned late model car, I realized that living the American dream in material ways is but a paltry experience when compared to the hour I had spent with Kari as she unfolded her spirituality and "stream-of-consciousness" thoughts. Her words had prompted a response and a spiritual bonding. This article can do but justice in a small way to the magical aura Kari radiates as she speaks. Her voice is felt as well as heard. Her gift of communication is rare. A note about the writer: Catharina Langhart is a freelance writer targeting non-fiction and fiction for international, national and local markets. She also teaches and lectures. Her interest is in working with women writers and special interest groups of all types giving supportive constructive criticisms and catering to a variety of writing and speaking needs. She is the director of Synergesis, an international writers' network. For more information of how she may serve the Houston community, call 446-6734.)