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Herizons Montrose National Organization for Women, Vol. 7, No. 6, August 1981
Page 4
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Herizons Montrose National Organization for Women, Vol. 7, No. 6, August 1981 - Page 4. August 1981. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1126/show/1123.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1981). Herizons Montrose National Organization for Women, Vol. 7, No. 6, August 1981 - Page 4. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1126/show/1123

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Herizons Montrose National Organization for Women, Vol. 7, No. 6, August 1981 - Page 4, August 1981, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1126/show/1123.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Herizons Montrose National Organization for Women, Vol. 7, No. 6, August 1981
Publisher Montrose Area National Organization for Women
Date August 1981
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1101 .H47
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1476034~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
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Title Page 4
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File Name femin_201109_205d.jpg
Transcript The "Those Who Do Not Remember Their History are Doomed To Repeat It" Column This is a slice of our history from the WOMEN FROM HISTORY series of postcards published by Helaine Victoria Enterprises, P.O. Box 1779, Martinville Indiana 46151 (address included so that you may write for a catalogue from this unique women's press if you desire). The postcard shows two sturdy women sitting side-by- side on a low stone wall. The legend on the reverse: "RADCLYFFE HALL (left, 1883-1943) and UNA LADY TROUBRIDGE (1892-1963). Hall and Troubridge, both British, lived and traveled together from the time they met until Hall's death 27 years later. Her second book, Adam's Breed, became an instant best seller in 1927 and established her literary reputation. It was a sensitive and unique story of a prosperous head- waiter who became so weary of rich foods that he starved himself to death. Success spurred Hall to what she considered her duty in writing The Well of Loneliness, a semiautobiographical novel of 'inversion' calculated to enlist public understanding. The first British edition was instantly seized by the Home Office and tried in the Magistrates Court. The publicity led to enormous sales and favorable reviews in other countries, but the proceedings took a heavy toll on Hall's spirits and health. Una Troubridge supported all her efforts, and became her biographer 'soon after she died. Both women were well known in the Italian and French cultural salons of the time, including that of Romaine Brooks, the American-born Parisian potraitist who painted Lady Troubridge." FIG. 62. THE GODDESS, STANDING ON MOUNTAIN Seal impression, Crete, late Palace period From The Great Mother: An Analysis of the Archetype, by Erich Neumann (Princeton University Press, 1955), p. 273. Don't believe what you read in the popular press about the relation between SPATIAL ABILITY AND HORMONES. An article in "Science News" (May 29, vol 121, no. 22, p 356) reporting new research quotes John Money, whom SN calls "a psychohormonal authority" at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. Money is skeptical: "The whole concept of androgen deficiency and spatial ability... is hogwash until somebody can measure that the actual brain cells that are supposed to be using androgen are unable to use it..." Quoted from Business Week, June 21, 1982: IF WOMEN DON'T GO INTO COMPUTERS The reasons that boys exhibit greater enthusiasm for computers seem to be predominantly cultural rather than genetic. "Girls do about as well as boys in computer literacy tests," says Ronald E. Anderson, associate professor of sociology at the University of Minnesota. "The best theory to explain it is that boys are brought up socialized to consider their careers more important. Girls are brought up to be concerned with softer subjects. They're not pressured into moth as much." Girls, whose historical "math phobia" has been documented in many studies, may steer clear of computers because the machines are predominantly used in mathematics classes. Biased Parents. Many educators blame other factors—particularly parental attitudes, male-oriented computer advertising, and video game violence—for the differrnce between boys' and girls' responses to computers. The greatest sex bias comes from the parents, claims Ellen Newman, co-owner of Computerkids Inc., a computer school in West Los Angeles. "When people walk into our school with a son and a daughter, they are only interested in enroll ling the son in the classes," she reports. Video game violence also encourages boys to play with computers while it discourages girls girls, according to educators. To be successful in a game, the player usually has to blow up a ship, drop a bomb, fire a missile, or knock someone off. "Girls are just bored with that," declares Judith B. Edwards Allen, director of the computer technology program at the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory in Portland, Ore. "I've told Atari the video game/computer subsidiary of Warner Communications Corp. that they should be trying to develop nonviolent games without the blow- 'em-away mentality so that girls can get involved," she reports, "and Atari said, 'Well, frankly, that isn't where the market is. Boys are the market.'"...