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Broadside, Vol. 3, No. 8, December 1972
Page 6
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Broadside, Vol. 3, No. 8, December 1972 - Page 6. December 1972. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1100/show/1097.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1972). Broadside, Vol. 3, No. 8, December 1972 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1100/show/1097

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Broadside, Vol. 3, No. 8, December 1972 - Page 6, December 1972, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/1100/show/1097.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Broadside, Vol. 3, No. 8, December 1972
Publisher National Organization for Women, Houston Chapter
Date December 1972
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Political activity--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Women--Texas--Houston--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
  • Newsletters
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • National Organization for Women
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location HQ1439 .H68 B75
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3767173~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
Item Description
Title Page 6
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File Name femin_201109_082f.jpg
Transcript Page 6 BROADSIDE December 1972 Essay Male Member Uncertain Concerning Men's Place In Women's Movement (Ed. note. All NOW members are urged to submit essays concerning any phase of the Revolution. If you wish, essays will be published anonymously.) People, both men and women first become involved in the movement in many ways. There are two main divisions. There are those who are already in the movement and then become radicalized and others who are already radicalized and then join the movement. My entrance took the form of the latter. Rummaging around a bookstore, I ccme across a novel by Marge Piercy. Its theme was the youth revolutionary movement and it intrigued me. I found myself gathering books on the youth movement, the SDS, etc., and suddenly subscribing to the Los Angeles Free Press and the East Village Other. In the course of "studying" other revolutionary movements I found myself carrying books home; books such as the Female Eunich, Sisterhood is Powerful and Woman in Sexist Society. I would sit crosslegged by the bed reading them to my wife. She became interested, and although I encouraged her to join, I found my feeling ambivalent about my own involvement in this particular aspect of a cultural revolution. I was unsure about the reception a male would receive. After my wife attended several meetings alone, I finally went with her. The first thing I noticed was the way women began to come out of themselves at these meetings. I found these women gathering themselves together and you could almost feel the suppressed rage and hostility. It seemed as though for many years these women had found themselves in untenable positions. And yet didn't know what to do about it. Although they had all of the things society considers desirable, two cars, disposals, etc., they were miserably unhappy. It seemed as though past reaction had been to blame themselves and all of a sudden they found themselves with other women who felt the same way. It dawned on them that perhaps the problem was not with themselves, but with the culture. Suddenly they were not wrong -- society was. This seems almost immediately to convert to hostility and anger. Once the tension was redirected from guilt to anger they began almost a catharsis of emotion, venting their hostility. One of the things I like about NOW is that it provides an outlet for this energy once the catharsis has taken place. It seems to me that NOW cures this rage and redirects it to meaningful goals. In reading about splinter groups in the movement such as the redstock- ings, and the early feminists, I saw that many became ingrown and are now defunct because consciousness-raising became an end in itself with with no action. NOW provides both consciousness-raising and action so that when a NOW member is asked, "What is it that you do?", there is an answer. They can talk about abortion reform, equal employment, childcare or any one of a number of things. As a male, I am very ambivalent about the extent males should become involved in the Revolution. I have had and continue to have many problems with this. There are sections of the women's movement that do not allow men to become members, and I am not so sure they may not be correct. Men have problems as well as women, but the basis of the oppression of white men is not sex. While it's true there are certain things required of men because of their sex, the enemy of men is not sexism. Black people have said that their enemy is not segregation — it is racism. Women have said their enemy is not discrimination — it is sexism. White males need to find their enemy and thereby define themselves, for it is by defining your enemy you define yourself. And for want of a better term, I shall refer to their enemy as inhumanity. From a male point of view, any liberation movement teaches us something. The black movement has not taught us what the women's movement has, and will, teach us. Most whites were not exposed to the growing pains of southern blacks, but everyone knows (or as Sam Ervin says, "has") a woman. To me, the movement asks two questions: Are you a chauvinist? There are many devious ways to answer no to that, but if you decide to take the bit in your teeth and answer, "Yes, I am a chauvinist," then you are not through with it. Because the second questions is, "What are you going to do about it?" And as long as you are in the company of women, this questions is going to be repeated over and over again. And if you do decide you are going to do something about it; if you decide you are going to stop being a chauvinist. If you say to yourself I will no longer be a part of the oppression, then you have gotten yourself into a very tricky situation. In order to.abandon chauvinism^, one must abandon the bulk of his cultural conditioning. While he is doing this, he is subject to the censure of other men and also many women. The question for men is -- is it worth the price? I think it is. I believe that although my reason for thinking this is not clear to me, it is exemplified by the things I have seen in the company of women who are liberated. I have noticed a real increase in the ability and capacity of women to love each other, the competitiveness of the early movement has withered to allow women to be more honest. And this to me is the most encouraging sign of all. For if women, who have traditionally been taught to be competitive with other women, can learn to love each other, then perhaps so can men. Nevertheless, I don't believe the elimination of sexism would solve the problems of women, at least not totally. Just as the elimination of capitalism wouldn't necessarily solve the problems of men. I think men are going to have to begin their own liberation movement. But it will not be a male liberation movement — it will be a human liberation movement. And it will be led by PEOPLE, regardless of sex.