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Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Page 38
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Kilby, Thomas. Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 38. 1843. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 17, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/735.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas. (1843). Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 38. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/735

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas, Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 38, 1843, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 17, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/735.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kilby, Thomas
Publisher Kilby, Thomas
Date 1843
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Wakefield, England
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 34 pages; 14 leaves; 38 cm
Original Item Location DA 690.W14K5 1843
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1816674~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_005
Item Description
Title Page 38
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_005_039.jpg
Transcript Mexborough, grandfather to the present earl, who resides in his own princely mansion, a short distance from the village, beloved by his numerous tenantry, and honoured and revered by the poor of his neighbourhood. In the days of our Saxon ancestors, the manor of Methley belonged conjointly to Osulph and Cnut, who, immediately after the Conquest, were despoiled of their possessions, "to make way for the great Norman lord Ilbert de Lacy, who made it one of the dependencies of his new fee of Pontefract."* It was subsequently granted to the Hospital of St. Nicholas in that town, by one of the representatives of this powerful baron; for in the eleventh year of Henry IV. a license was granted to the master or warden of that house to exchange this manor with Sir Robert Waterton, who thus became seised of Methley.t "This Sir Robert Waterton," says Dr. Whitaker, "'was a very distinguished character in his time. He had first, as appears from the terms of his will, served Richard II., and afterwards Henry IV., to whom he was master of the horse. Though he survived Henry V., he makes no mention of him; which renders it likely that, on his accession, he had withdrawn himself from court. He was steward of the honour of Pontefract 4th Henry IV.; and was one of the knights who, with the Earl of Westmoreland, attempted to stop the progress of Henry Earl of Northumberland in the insurrection terminated by the death of that nobleman." J In the first folio of Camden's Britannia, complimentary mention is made of Sir John Savile, who, about that time, seems to have become possessed of the lordship of Methley, whether by purchase or by inheritance I am unable to state. The present noble proprietor, to whom this work is dedicated with feelings of sincere gratitude for so generous an expression of cordiality and prompt concurrence with the wishes of its author, is not the first member of his distinguished family who, by a rare combination of courtesy and wit, has graced the circle in which he mingles, and diffused throughout an air of hilarity and happiness. The halls of his ancestors have long been renowned as the scene of generous and enlightened hospitality, in which the "wittiest and most learned men of the age" were wont to assemble. There is a letter § among the Strafford papers, from Sir Henry Wotton to Sir Thomas Wentworth (afterwards Earl Strafford), which speaks with delight of the " Methley triplicity," as he facetiously designates it, of which Henry Lord Clifford formed one. Such guests and such converse as doubtless they would indulge in evidently imply " an elegant and intelligent host." And hence the character which appears to have attached to this family for a long season; for " every branch of the Saviles," says Dr. Whitaker, " has at different periods, and in different ways, produced men of genius."|| * Loidis and Elmete, p. 268. t Ibid. p. 269. X About two centuries and a half subsequently to this period the descendant of this brave soldier exhibited his attachment to Charles, and his own intrepidity, by defending his isolated castle against a troop of Cromwell's horse, which had been despatched to take possession of his family seat at Walton. On this occasion "the valiant squire raised his drawbridge, and defied the assailants in his island fortress. Thus baffled, they seem to have contented themselves with firing their carbines and pistols into an old oak gateway, which still holds a few of their bullets half buried in the wood." His descendant, Charles Waterton, Esq., whose " Wanderings" have furnished a museum with stuffed birds of unparalleled beauty, and whose kindness and liberality in exhibiting the same to the public cannot be sufficiently appreciated, resides in this seat of his comparatively modern ancestors. § Dated April 8th, 1628 ; Strafford's Letters, b. i. p. 45. || Loidis and Elmete, p. 273.