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Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Page 37
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Kilby, Thomas. Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 37. 1843. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/734.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas. (1843). Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 37. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/734

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas, Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 37, 1843, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/734.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kilby, Thomas
Publisher Kilby, Thomas
Date 1843
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Wakefield, England
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 34 pages; 14 leaves; 38 cm
Original Item Location DA 690.W14K5 1843
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1816674~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_005
Item Description
Title Page 37
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_005_038.jpg
Transcript METHLEY PARK AND CHURCH. The parish-church of Methley, situated about 5J miles (N.E. by N.) from Wakefield, is dedicated to King Oswald, the patron saint, whose image, with a crown upon his head and a sceptre in his right hand, is represented sitting within a small ornamented niche above the south door. This figure is thought to be " contemporary with the foundation of the church and parish.'' In proof of the great antiquity to which the original edifice lays claim, we may observe that it is mentioned in Doomsday Book, " which (as it refers to the survey of Yorkshire) may be fixed about the year 1080." The present structure, especially the embattled tower and spire, bears considerable resemblance to that of Wakefield, though greatly inferior in dimensions; and from this circumstance I should be inclined to think it may have been erected about the same time. Not a vestige of the original building remains, with the exception of the effigy already referred to: it abounds, nevertheless, in objects of interesting association ; for few churches in the county can boast such an assemblage of sumptuous monuments of marble and alabaster as are contained within its sacred precincts. There, side by side, repose in dismal majesty the sages, and heroes, and beauties of a former age—the dead addressing most intelligible language to the living, and with mute but irresistible eloquence declaring that the riches of the rich, the achievements of the mighty, and the honours of the most honourable, are nothing worth unless they be made subservient to the great end of our being; since "it is appointed unto men once to die, and after this the judgment." The chantry on the south side of the choir (founded and endowed by Robert Waterton the elder, a.d. 1424) is, as it were, crowded with monumental carving and escutcheons. The first which attracts the eye is that of Robert Waterton and Cicely* his wife; these lie stretched beneath an elaborately wrought canopy, upon "an highly elevated altar-tomb, their hands elevated as in prayer, the knight's head reposing on an helmet crested with a plume of feathers." Opposite this, against the south wall of the chapel, is a tomb of alabaster, upon which are two recumbent figures, male and female, the former clad in armour, the eyes and hands of each being raised toward heaven. This tomb, though without inscription, is embellished with armorial bearings, which, " beyond all doubt, appropriate it to Lionel Lord Welles, who fell at the Battle of Towton," and who, with his wife Cicely, daughter of Sir Robert Waterton, was buried here. In the features of Lord Welles there is much character and expression, and in that of his lady great beauty and sweetness; and hence this design has been attributed to a somewhat later date, even to the reign of Henry VII., as previously to that period "no real expression had been given to the human countenance, either in sculpture or coinage." Between these is a sumptuous monument, commemorative of the founder of the present family, Sir John Savile, of Bradley and Methley, baron of the exchequer. His body was not interred here; consequently the tomb, " erected about thirty years after his death, with the exception of his heart, is, as to himself, really a cenotaph." On the north of the choir is a richly designed monument, by Scheemakers, to the memory of Charles Savile, Esq., a descendant of Baron Savile; and opposite to this, the last of the series, is one of even superior magnificence, "with the figure of the deceased in robes, with the collar of the order of the Bath," to the first Earl of * In Glover's Visitation this lady's name is Beatrice.