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Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Page 30
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Kilby, Thomas. Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 30. 1843. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/727.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas. (1843). Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 30. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/727

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas, Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 30, 1843, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/727.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kilby, Thomas
Publisher Kilby, Thomas
Date 1843
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Wakefield, England
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 34 pages; 14 leaves; 38 cm
Original Item Location DA 690.W14K5 1843
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1816674~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_005
Item Description
Title Page 30
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_005_031.jpg
Transcript NORTH-EAST VIEW OF THE WEST-RIDING PROPRIETARY SCHOOL AND ST. JOHNS CHURCH. The foundation-stone of this elegant structure, erected at a cost exceeding £5000, was laid by the Right Honourable the Earl of Mexborough, on the 6th of February, 1833. His lordship, accompanied by his two chaplains, and a large body of free and accepted masons, officiated on this occasion in the capacity of provincial grand master. The constable of the town, Mr. Lane the architect, and a number of shareholders and friends, also joined in the procession. No similar establishment in the kingdom ever began its operations under more favourable auspices. At the period of its erection, the want of such an institution was universally felt throughout the riding; and no sooner had the intention of building a suitable edifice at Wakefield been announced than several of the Yorkshire nobility and gentry expressed their readiness cordially to assist in the undertaking, and to enrol their names among its first patrons and directors. Indeed, the unparalleled brilliancy of its commencement seems in some degree to have eclipsed its more recent career of usefulness; whilst the judicious laws originally adopted for its general government, however strange it may appear, have tended to rob it of that full measure of success to which it might legitimately lay claim. " In developing the plans for the various departments of tuition/' great care had been taken to select every thing good and excellent in more ancient kindred establishments, and to shun whatever might prove either hurtful or of doubtful utility: in short, it was the anxious desire of the projectors that " positive knowledge should be communicated, and not the fleeting shadows of mere wordy instruction." In furtherance of this object, men of high academical honours and moral worth were chosen to conduct the scholastic department. Regulations obviously so wise, and withal so well adapted to win the confidence of the public, and to accomplish the great end in view, immediately attracted the notice of intelligent and enterprising men; and hence the erection of many similar institutions in various localities, viz. in York, Hull, Sheffield, Huddersfield, and elsewhere. This circumstance accounts for a diminution in the number of its pupils: in truth, it may be said to be the entire cause of that diminution; especially as the directors have continued ever since to appoint gentlemen of unblemished integrity and pre-eminent literary attainments as the masters of this school, who, treading in the steps of their distinguished predecessors, and being actuated by one all-engrossing desire to promote the moral and intellectual improvement of those committed to their charge, labour in their arduous and responsible vocation with unwearied industry and zeal. To enumerate the various incentives to honourable competition which are continually presented to the mind of youth in this seminary of sound learning would cause a more lengthened investigation into details than could well accord with a work of this character. It may suffice to say, they are such as to afford an ample guarantee