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Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Page 27
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Kilby, Thomas. Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 27. 1843. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 17, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/724.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas. (1843). Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 27. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/724

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas, Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 27, 1843, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 17, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/724.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kilby, Thomas
Publisher Kilby, Thomas
Date 1843
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Wakefield, England
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 34 pages; 14 leaves; 38 cm
Original Item Location DA 690.W14K5 1843
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1816674~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_005
Item Description
Title Page 27
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_005_028.jpg
Transcript LAWE HILL AND THORNES HOUSE. What that singular relic of antiquity may originally have been which for more than three centuries has gone by the appellation of Lawe Hill, is a matter involved in doubt and uncertainty. Leland, in his " Itinerary," mentions a legendary story in relation to it, which, although regarded by himself as entirely fabulous and absurd, had nevertheless obtained general credence, viz. that the Earl of Warren had commenced building a castle there, from which undertaking he was compelled to desist, because " as faste as he builded violence of winde defaced the work." Dugdale remarks (p. 3), that " it derives its name from a tumulus or little heap of earth standing on the brow of a hill;" and Camden, in his " Remains," also observes, that " the Scots who border nearest to England do use the word in the same sense unto this day." This may be perfectly true in respect to its derivation, but still it leaves us in entire ignorance as to the use to which it had been anciently applied. The appearance of the ground toward the west, evidently resembling that of a moat or trench, has induced the supposition that at one time it may have been a Roman keep, or post of observation. " Sum say that it was nothing but a winde-mille- hill;" whilst others regard it as the site of a beacon in troublous times, " from low, or law, signifying a fire or flame;" but the presence of a large platform to the north-east, equal to the accommodation of a vast assembly, has not only thrown doubt upon these suggestions, but led to the inference that in bygone ages this spot may have been consecrated to the purposes of heathen worship.* Where history is wholly silent, and tradition supplies no materials calculated to throw light on the inquiry, the mind is left at liberty to adopt any hypothesis the most consonant with reason and analogy. To proclaim the law from a mound of earth collected from each separate parish in the island, which mound, during the lapse of many centuries, has attained considerable altitude, is a custom which has existed time immemorial in the Isle of Man. Might not the small conical tumulus above the platform on Lawe Hill have been applied to the same purpose when written laws were unknown, and when every new enactment must have been delivered orally to the people congregated together in some convenient place ? If I am not greatly mistaken, such a custom was universally prevalent among our Saxon ancestors, who usually selected high ground for the purpose referred to. Johnson, in his English Lexicon, derives law—" a decree, edict, statute, or custom, publicly established as a rule of justice"—from lawgh, Erse. I merely throw out this hint for the consideration of others, without laying any great stress upon the etymology. Before I conclude these remarks, I would briefly observe, that Lawe Hill was made a fortified encampment during the Civil War, a battery having been planted there by Colonel Overton at the siege of Sandal Castle. A little to the right of the picture, embosomed in woods in the distance, is Thornes House, the seat of Benjamin Gaskell, Esq., late M.P. for Maiden. From the commanding position of the pleasure-grounds * The Rev. Dr. Naylor, rector of Crofton, in a lecture lately delivered before the members of the Wakefield Mechanics' Institute, writes thus : " We know that our remote ancestors held all their public meetings in the open air, and in the days of Druidism, particularly in the neighbourhood of woods. The whole country to the north and west of this place was an extensive and almost continuous forest, and by no means unadapted to be the place of their religious or civic assemblies : the mound itself may have afforded a place of separation for the Druids themselves to exercise their sacred rites, while the people at a distance looked on with awe and veneration."