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Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Page 25
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Kilby, Thomas. Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 25. 1843. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 17, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/722.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas. (1843). Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 25. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/722

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas, Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 25, 1843, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 17, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/722.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kilby, Thomas
Publisher Kilby, Thomas
Date 1843
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Wakefield, England
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 34 pages; 14 leaves; 38 cm
Original Item Location DA 690.W14K5 1843
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1816674~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_005
Item Description
Title Page 25
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_005_026.jpg
Transcript built; which estates were sold to Francis Maude, of Wakefield, esquire, and John Lee, of the same place, gentleman, subject to the payment of the said sum of £1000; whereupon a subscription was entered into, and very liberal donations made by the inhabitants of the said parish and others towards the erecting of such intended new church." At the time when the act referred to was obtained, it was confidently expected that the income arising from pew-rents and other sources would yield so ample a provision to the minister of St. John's Church, as to prove equivalent to that of the vicarage. The large expenditure, however, upon the church and parsonage not only laid these sanguine expectations prostrate, but exhibited a very opposite result. Hence the petition referred to, the object of which was to participate in the bounty of an individual who had reared his own imperishable monument in Oxford;* and who has conferred honour upon the town of which he was a native. I may here remark, that the prayer of the petition was liberally responded to by Dr. Radcliffe's trustees; and that to it the incumbent of St. John's (who has no pew-rents) is indebted for a large proportion of his scanty revenues. In speaking of the interior of the church, very few words may suffice. Though it cannot lay claim to any great architectural beauty, still, upon the whole, it may be described as rather a tasteful edifice, the Corinthian pillars and intervening arches, which support the ceiling, being extremely light and elegant. The massy mahogany pulpit and reading-desk also, erected at a cost of £300, are generally much admired for the novelty displayed in their construction, and the convenience of their arrangements. These stand in the middle aisle, and command a full view of the whole congregation. Within the eastern semicircular recess, appropriated to the communion-table, there are three paintings. The centre composition represents the Crucifixion; the one to the left, the Agony in the Garden; and that to the right, the Resurrection. The Crucifixion is decidedly the best picture, though they are all the works of the same artist. In the window immediately above is exhibited a variety of small Scripture subjects in painted glass, so grouped together as to form a cross. To the left, within a recess, is a whole-length figure, as large as life, in good imitation of sculpture, having in one hand a rod, in the other the tables of stone. On the opposite side, within a similar compartment, is another figure of equal dimensions, holding in one hand a book, the other pointing toward heaven. These, I apprehend, are intended to represent Moses and one of the apostles, and thereby to symbolise the two covenants, the Law and the Gospel. Upon the walls are fixed many handsome sepulchral tablets, commemorative of those who sleep in the vaulted cemetery beneath. There is, however, one wanting to the memory of a gentleman whose namef is inseparably associated with St. John's, and to whose intelligence and enterprise the inhabitants of Wakefield are indebted for a suburb such as few provincial towns can boast the possession of. To erect a suitable memorial has long been in contemplation, but I believe it has been delayed through unavoidable circumstances. The ground upon which the church stands is elevated, and commands, in a westerly direction, a varied and extensive prospect. The view to which this description refers is taken from a field a little to the north-west of St. John's; and the lights, as they are disposed in the drawing, maybe seen about 11 a.m., on any bright summer's day. * The RadclifFe Library. t John Lee, Esq,