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Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Page 22
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Kilby, Thomas. Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 22. 1843. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/719.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas. (1843). Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 22. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/719

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas, Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 22, 1843, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/719.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kilby, Thomas
Publisher Kilby, Thomas
Date 1843
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Wakefield, England
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 34 pages; 14 leaves; 38 cm
Original Item Location DA 690.W14K5 1843
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1816674~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_005
Item Description
Title Page 22
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_005_023.jpg
Transcript to the credit of the churchwardens and other officers connected with the establishment, always exhibits an air of great comfort, cleanliness, and order) contains a number of marble monuments, some of which are eminently worthy the structure they adorn, though none of them can boast any remote antiquity. " The brasses, so common in our large churches, were destroyed or stolen in those disastrous times when neither the sanctity of the place wherein they were deposited, nor the respect usually paid to the sepulchres of the dead, could protect them from violation;" and the parish-church of Wakefield seems to have been peculiarly exposed to this species of sacrilegious plunder. But as all these matters are described in detail in the Historic Sketch of Wakefield Church, by the Rev. J. L. Sisson, D.D., I would recommend the perusal of that work to those who may desire more extensive information. Before I conclude this brief outline (for it is nothing more), I would observe, that the recent removal of the pulpit from the place it has so long occupied, though it may have exhibited the altar more fully to view, and improved, perhaps, the general effect of the building, still it has most unfortunately communicated additional prominence to a painting which had better have remained shrouded from the gaze of the congregation. If we must needs return to what is termed " primitive and apostolic usage,"* pictures no less than carved images and statues should be peremptorily excluded from our religious edifices; but if they are to remain,—to which I can discover no objection, unless they should once more become the objects of man's senseless idolatry, like the brazen serpent which good King Hezekiah, in his holy zeal for the honour of God, destroyed,f—then let nothing be admitted into our churches save works of acknowledged excellence, the productions of the best masters. The time, I trust, is not far distant, when the unsightly composition just referred to, which is a disgrace to the church, and which has been known to distract the attention and disturb the devotion of many a sincere and humble worshipper, may be removed, and something substituted in its place more consonant with the sanctity of the spot, and more worthy the sacred edifice which it has been designed to embellish. * u Coming to Anablatha, a village in Palestine, and going into a church to pray, I espied," says Epiphanius, * a curtain hanging over the door, whereon was painted the image of Christ, or of some saint; which when I looked upon, and saw the image of a man hanging up in the church, contrary to the authority of the Holy Scriptures, I presently rent it, and advised the guardians of the church rather to make use of it as a winding-sheet for some poor man's burying: whereat when they were a little troubled, and said it was but just that, since I had rent that curtain, I should change it, and give them another, I promised them I would, and have now sent the best I could get; and pray entreat them to accept it, and give command that, for the time to come, no such curtains, being contrary to our religion, may be hung in the church of Christ; it more becoming your place solicitously to remove whatever is offensive to and unworthy of the church of Christ and the people committed to your charge."* t 2 Kings xviii. 4. a Epiphanius' own epistle, (then Bishop of Salamine in Cyprus, a man held in high esteem in the Church for his great age and excellent learning), addressed to John Bishop of Jerusalem, and translated by St. Jerome {inter opera Hieron. torn. ii. p. 161). Epiphanius nourished about