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Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Page 21
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Kilby, Thomas. Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 21. 1843. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 17, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/718.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas. (1843). Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 21. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/718

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas, Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 21, 1843, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 17, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/718.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kilby, Thomas
Publisher Kilby, Thomas
Date 1843
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Wakefield, England
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 34 pages; 14 leaves; 38 cm
Original Item Location DA 690.W14K5 1843
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1816674~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_005
Item Description
Title Page 21
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_005_022.jpg
Transcript of this towne ;' and with their story, as connected with Wakefield, I shall begin. At the time of Domesday, William de Warenne was already in possession of Conisborough, with its numerous and valuable dependencies; but Wakefield, with its berewicks and its soke, was yet in the crown. Now, whether in that interval De Warenne had rendered fresh services to the Conqueror, or that his master might be disposed to bestow his favours so as to retain the double pledge of expectation and gratitude, Wakefield was the object of a subsequent grant, of which the date is not precisely ascertained. The first William de Warenne died June 24, 1088; and the first legal act by which it can be proved that the family were seised of the manor of Wakefield, with its dependent lordships, is the charter of William the second Earl of Warren, by which he grants to God and St. Pancras of Lewis, besides other churches not immediately within the range of this work, 'Ecclesiam de Wakefeld cum capella de Horbyry et omnibus pertinenciis suis.' This charter, like almost every other charter of that period, is without date. It seems clear that Thomas Drayton was the first vicar presented by the College of St. Stephen; and that Edward III., who, in consequence of the grant from John the last Earl Warren, was seised of both the manor and advowson, had bestowed the latter on that college, which was of his own foundation. " What, then, becomes of the donation of this church to the church of St. Pancras of Lewis, which must have taken effect ? The only answer which I am able to give to the question is, as there is extant a confirmation, by Archbishop Geoffry Plantagenet, of a pension of sixty shillings out of this benefice to the monks of Lewis, it is probable that they released the advowson to the representative of the original patron for that consideration. " Ult. November, A.D. 1348, the church (being given by the king) was, by William Archbishop of York, appropriated to the dean and college of the free Chapel Royal of St. Stephen, in the king's palace of Westminster, who, in recompense of the damage done to his cathedral church thereby, reserved (out of the fruits thereof, to himself and successors, archbishops) the annual pension of 20s., and to his dean and chapter \0s. And at Ripon, 2d January, A.D. 1349, William Archbishop of York made this ordination of the vicarage of the church of Wakefield, which was wont to be governed by a rector secular, and appropriated to the dean and college of St. Stephen's, Westminster, viz. That there should be in the church of Wakefield one perpetual vicar (having the rule of souls) presentable by the said dean and college of St. Stephen, the portion of whose vicarage should exist in one competent mansion, with houses sufficient, built at the costs of the said dean and college, c together with sundry tythes, oblations, mortuaries, &c. &c.' Until its dissolution, this college continued to present, when the patronage once more reverted to, and has ever since remained vested in, the crown." With respect to the architectural beauty of this edifice, I believe it will be freely admitted that few churches in the north of England can successfully compete with it, although the eye of taste may easily detect many glaring incongruities in those parts of the structure which have been subjected to modern repair and innovation. Indeed, the tout-ensemble is stately and imposing. There is throughout the fabric a prevailing symmetry, which produces a most pleasing and even sublime effect upon the mind of the beholder; and I deem it rather matter of congratulation than regret that, at the time when those repairs were effected (a time u when deformity and barbarism were daily obtruded on the public eye under the name of Gothic," and when designs were usually submitted to the approval of ignorant committees and parish-vestries), our venerable church should have sustained comparatively so little injury in a restoration so extensive.* The interior of this church (which, * Indeed, this fact is truly remarkable, when it is borne in mind that even Sir Christopher Wren (who was a hater of that style which he contemptuously designated Gothic) could attach Grecian bodies to beautiful Gothic towers: which may be seen both at Derby and Warwick.