Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Page 20
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Kilby, Thomas. Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 20. 1843. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/717.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas. (1843). Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 20. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/717

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas, Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 20, 1843, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/717.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kilby, Thomas
Publisher Kilby, Thomas
Date 1843
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Wakefield, England
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 34 pages; 14 leaves; 38 cm
Original Item Location DA 690.W14K5 1843
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1816674~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_005
Item Description
Title Page 20
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_005_021.jpg
Transcript pagan temples were converted into Christian churches, the presence of the cross was generally deemed a sufficient consecration.* And instances are not wanting of refusal on the part of our Protestant bishops to repeat the ceremony of consecration, because some ancient cross within the contemplated enclosure seemed to indicate that the spot upon which it stood had, at some remote period, been devoted to sacred uses.f "On the ides of August, A.D. 1322 or 1329, we find, however, that a new church in Wakefield had been erected and finished; for on that day it was actually consecrated by Archbishop William de Melton, with four altars;—that of the high choir, dedicated to All Saints ; the altar on the south, to the Blessed Virgin ; that on the north, to St. Nicholas; and that in the middle of the church, to St. Peter." I do not pretend to be sufficiently conversant with matters of this kind to form any decided opinion as to the probable decision of a Roman Catholic archbishop on a subject in which, most likely, he would be guided by ancient and established usage. I am, however, strongly inclined to believe that the church he then consecrated was a structure newly dedicated to God, and that the " original Norman church, adapted only to the circumstances of a mere village/' must have stood elsewhere. Preparatory to the dissolution of the monasteries, " in the palmy days of the Church of Rome," Wakefield had been abundantly supplied with places of religious worship, and with priests to officiate therein. From Archbishop Holgate's return, it would appear that there were no fewer than nine chantries in the town, having chantry-priests attached to them, all of whom were located within the parish. At this remote period it is difficult, if not impossible, to fix upon the exact situation of each, though that of the major part may be ascertained with tolerable accuracy. The chantry of two priests, in the middle of Wakefield Bridge, is sufficiently defined; that of our Lady, it is thought, formed the south aisle of the choir of the present church; and the Pilkington Chapel, founded by Sir John Pilkington, constituted a distinct foundation within. The chantry of St. Swithin, founded by Earl Warren, was no doubt situated near the well which still retains his name: an old record says that it stood near the park-paling. The chapel of St. Mary Maudeleine, founded by the parishioners, was perhaps near Maudeleine Bridge, to the western extremity of the town,—and hence its name; and that of St. John, founded by John Lock, was a little to the north-east, where is a field still called St. John's Close. With respect to the remaining chantries, viz. Soothill's Chantry of four priests, founded by Henry Soothill; Graistock Chantry, founded by William Graistock; Banister's Chantry, founded by Thurston Banister;— I believe their precise situation in the town has baffled the most diligent research of the scholar and antiquary. The old edifice in which a number of carved images was discovered about ninety years ago, is suspected to have been originally one of these chantries; but inasmuch as this is mere conjecture, unsupported by evidence, though it may justly be entitled to consideration, still it cannot legitimately claim more at our hands. The subject which next demands our attention is that which relates to the advowson and its ancient patrons. I here transcribe the following historical facts from Whitaker's Loidis and Elmete, pp. 277 and 287> to which I would refer the reader for further particulars :—" ' The Guarines, erles of Surrey,' saith Leland, c were ons lords * See Cod. Theod. lib. xvi. tit. 10, de Pag. Sacrific. et Templis, &c. f " At Clickheaton is a chape], called Old White Chapel in the East, which, having long been dilapidated and afterwards repaired, Archbishop Sharp declined to consecrate, partly on account of the antiquity implied in the name,* and partly from an aged yew-tree growing in the churchyard." • " It is called Heaton Chapel in Saxton's Map, a.d. 1575."—Dr. Whitaker's Loidis and Elmete, p. 249.