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Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Page 19
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Kilby, Thomas. Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 19. 1843. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 17, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/716.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas. (1843). Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 19. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/716

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas, Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 19, 1843, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 17, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/716.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kilby, Thomas
Publisher Kilby, Thomas
Date 1843
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Wakefield, England
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 34 pages; 14 leaves; 38 cm
Original Item Location DA 690.W14K5 1843
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1816674~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_005
Item Description
Title Page 19
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_005_020.jpg
Transcript PARISH-CHURCH AND TOWN, PINDAR FIELDS.* The parish-church of Wakefield is a beautiful Gothic structure, of large dimensions, supposed to have been built about A.D. 1465. The learned historian of Leeds considers that it occupies precisely the same site as did the "original Norman church, which must have subsisted till the beginning of the reign of Edward III.* That a circumstance so remarkable should be left to vague and uncertain conjecture, and that history should have contributed nothing toward the elucidation of a fact now buried, it is to be feared, in hopeless oblivion, is indeed most inexplicable. The tower, which, from its base to its spiral summit, measures 228 feet, is thought by the same author to have belonged to a former church, the body of which was completely demolished within the short space of 140 years after its erection. The architect who could plan and execute so stupendous and so elegant a tower is certain to have preserved unity of design throughout the entire fabric. Time, of itself, could effect comparatively nothing toward so extensive a demolition; and I am not aware that the history of that period tends, in the least, to remove the mysterious darkness in which the subject is enveloped: we must, consequently, for the future, look in vain for any satisfactory explanation of a circumstance apparently so strange and unaccountable. In describing the present noble structure as it appeared in the reign of Henry VIII., Leland writes thus: " The principal church that now is yn Wakefild is but of a new work, but it is exceeding faire and large/' He further remarks: *' Some think that wer as now is a chapell of ease, at the other ende of the towne, was ons the old paroch-church." With due deference to so high an authority as that of Dr. Whitaker, who appears to controvert the truth of this latter statement, I am free to confess my inability altogether to withhold assent to this tradition, more especially as subsequent excavations, in the immediate vicinity of the West-Riding Proprietary School, have discovered the foundation of an ancient massy building, together with bones and a number of mutilated gravestones, which, at different intervals, have been dug up near the same spot. Prior to the Conquest, Wakefield had become a separate parish, and, no doubt, had a church suited to its then existing population; and I do not think the argument deduced from the magnitude, convenience, and assumed antiquity of the rectory-house, together with its adjacency to the present elegant structure, of sufficient weight to throw discredit upon the traditionary account of a more ancient parish-church having previously existed within the precincts of the town, toward its northern extremity. To consecrate a church on its being re- edified was by no means a common custom in the earlier period of our ecclesiastical history. Though "the primitive disciples of Christ were not more heartily zealous against the idolatrous worship of the heathen gods than they were religiously observant of whatever concerned the honour and worship of the true/' still, whenever * The field whence this view of the church and town is taken has acquired some celebrity from the circumstance that tradition attributes to it the identical spot where, unaided and alone, the Pindar of Wakefield resolutely defended the right of her citizens from the bold encroachments of the far-famed Robin Hood and his two lawless companions.