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Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Page 15
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Kilby, Thomas. Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 15. 1843. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 17, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/712.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas. (1843). Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 15. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/712

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas, Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 15, 1843, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 17, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/712.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kilby, Thomas
Publisher Kilby, Thomas
Date 1843
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Wakefield, England
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 34 pages; 14 leaves; 38 cm
Original Item Location DA 690.W14K5 1843
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1816674~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_005
Item Description
Title Page 15
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_005_016.jpg
Transcript (especially as the edifice in question is dedicated to St. Mary), I am inclined to hazard the conjecture, that the first compartment, nearest Wakefield, may have contained a representation of the Annunciation ; and that the last, nearest Sandal, by some thought to represent two kings seated upon two thrones, is intended to personify the Father and the Son—the latter seated at the right hand of God. Such attempts, though unquestionably bordering on profaneness, have frequently been made both in painting and sculpture. Admitting, then, this conjecture to be not wholly groundless, the sculptured designs in the five compartments would seem to form a consecutive history of Christ, commencing with the Annunciation, proceeding with the Nativity, Resurrection, and Ascension of our Lord, and terminating with his glorious Exaltation to the right hand of the Majesty on high. Be this, however, as it may, the testimony of an eye-witness, of an architect who made a careful sketch of the chapel and its various embellishments, and who, at the time, experienced no difficulty whatever in deciphering three out of the five basso-relievos, must, I think, be deemed satisfactory as far as it goes. The wish, therefore, expressed by Dr. Whitaker, in his " Loidis and Elmete," viz. " that the perishing sculptures on the front could be discovered to throw any light upon the subject/5 is so far realised as to leave little doubt in the mind of the antiquarian, that the chapel owes its erection to circumstances wholly independent of the battle of Wakefield. Indeed, all difficulty upon this subject is removed by a charter of Edward III., dated at Wakefield, in the 31st year of his reign, anno 1357,* by which instrument he grants " to William Kaye and William Bull, chaplains, and their successors for ever, the annual sum of 10/., to perform divine service daily in the chapel of St. Mary, then newly erected on Wakefield Bridge.'5—I had written thus much when the " Improved Essay on this and other Ancient Bridge-Chantries/' by Norrisson Scatchard, Esq., fell into my hands; and I feel gratified in bearing my feeble testimony to a work which contains much valuable information and original remark : indeed, no one can carefully peruse the essay in question without feeling the force of the argument, and recognising in the evidence adduced very strong proof of the fact for which the author contends, viz. that " the edifice on Wakefield Bridge, commonly, but erroneously, called the Chapel of Edward IV.," was erected about a century earlier, even at a period when the ornamental Gothic, with its rich and elaborate tracery, is known to have attained its highest excellence. But to enter into any lengthened discussion on a subject which, after all, may remain matter of controversy, would not consist with the design of these brief notices. Let me, therefore, congratulate the admirers of our ancient ecclesiastical edifices and the friends of religion, that vigorous efforts are now being made, not only to restore this interesting relic of a former age to its pristine beauty, but to dedicate it to the worship of Almighty God in conformity with the doctrine and discipline of the Established Church. * Vide Hopkinson's Collections.