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Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Page 14
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Kilby, Thomas. Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 14. 1843. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 17, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/711.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas. (1843). Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 14. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/711

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas, Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 14, 1843, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 17, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/711.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kilby, Thomas
Publisher Kilby, Thomas
Date 1843
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Wakefield, England
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 34 pages; 14 leaves; 38 cm
Original Item Location DA 690.W14K5 1843
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1816674~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_005
Item Description
Title Page 14
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_005_015.jpg
Transcript THE TOWN OF WAKEFIELD, FROM NEAR NELSON'S FOUNDRY. Few towns in the West Riding of Yorkshire enjoy equal natural advantages with the Borough of Wakefield, Beautiful as to its locality, being "principally situated on the side of an eminence sloping to the river Calder," and surrounded on all sides by pleasing and picturesque scenery; abounding in coal of excellent quality, and water admirably adapted for the purposes of dyeing; possessing also peculiar facilities for the conveyance of goods as well to the German Ocean as to the densely populated districts of Lancashire,—it is somewhat remarkable that it should not have continued to advance in wealth and bnportance with the large towns In Ita imi diate vicinage. "The traveller/' says Dr. Whitaker, "who turns westward from the (mat North Road toward the English Apennine, quickly discovers that he is entering upon an inferior country. The vecnery, indeed, becomes more varied and interesting; but the buildings begin to grow rude, and the ehurehes decline in splendour/' Several years have now elapsed since Wakefield could number among it> citizens man] rich, enterprisingj and influential foreign merchants, who were then carrying on trade upon a largi nd accumulating immen* wealth. Leland, in describing it three centuries ago, states that it derived its principal revenue from the manufacture of woollen cloths—"it standeth now al by clothying." This branch of trade has, however, <>t late yean given place to an extensive traffic in corn and wool, which are its staph' commodities* For the accommodation of those gentlemen who are engaged in the former business, a beautiful stone building, of large dimensions (called the Corn-Exchange), has, within the last five years, been erected, at a cost of several thousand pounds. Though various and fanciful have been the conjectures relative to the derivation of the name by which the town is designated, still the best authorities would seem to deduce it from its first Saxon possessor. " Nothn says Dr. Whitaker, "was more common, at the time when the villare of this country was formed, than to denominate whole townships by the terminating syllable, field."* The coins and other Roman antiquities which, during the last century, have been discovered near Lingwell Gate,t sufficiently indicate the existence of a Roman station not far from hence. J Intimately connected with the history of Wakefield is the history of its manor, which is one of the largest in the kingdom, extending from east to west a distance of more than thirty miles, and comprising a population * See History of Leeds, p. 275. t Camden, the father of British antiquaries, derives the name of this place from a body of Lingones, a people of ancient Gaul, who were stationed there—most likely a detachment from the legion of Lingones long stationed at Olicana, now Ilkley. t " In March, 1821, on breaking the ground with the plough, a number of Roman coins, with several of the moulds in which they were cast, were unexpectedly turned up near Lingwell Gate; and subsequent search discovered many more, some in the very matrixes in which they had been cast. Four crucibles, in which the metal had been fused, were also found at the same place."—Dr. Naylor's original MS.