Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Page 11
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Kilby, Thomas. Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 11. 1843. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/708.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas. (1843). Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 11. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/708

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas, Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 11, 1843, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/708.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kilby, Thomas
Publisher Kilby, Thomas
Date 1843
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Wakefield, England
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 34 pages; 14 leaves; 38 cm
Original Item Location DA 690.W14K5 1843
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1816674~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_005
Item Description
Title Page 11
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_005_012.jpg
Transcript r BRIDGE AND CHAPEL. This bridge, which consists of nine arches, was built in the reign of Edward III. The pointed Gothic arch, according to its original design, is still preserved on its eastern side; and it is much to be lamented that a due regard to architectural consistency was not observed, when, about fifty or sixty years ago, it was widened and rendered more commodious. According to Leland, the battle of Wakefield, between the houses of York and Lancaster, was fought a little to the south of this bridge; and it was to perpetuate the memory of his father, and to secure constant requiems for the souls of the slain, that Edward duke of York, afterwards Edward IV., re-endowed that " right goodly chapel of our Lady," which for a century preceding had not only constituted an interesting feature in the landscape, but had proved a guide to many a benighted traveller. From its contiguity to the spot where the Earl of Rutland fell (which even now bears the name of " the fallings"), it is conjectured, and with every colour of probability, that he was hastening thither to a place of sanctuary when overtaken by the murderous Clifford. This little chantry, together with the antique bridge, forms a pleasing and picturesque combination of objects, especially from the road leading toward Heath. Being built upon a small island immediately contiguous to the bridge, and projecting eastward about 30 feet, it overhangs the river Calder, in whose waves it is reflected; whilst its western front, measuring about 18 feet, ranges in a direct line with the battlement parallel with the footpath. It would be difficult, if not impossible, to convey an adequate idea of the varied beauties of this little structure except through the medium of an architectural drawing upon a large scale, carefully made out in all its details. The architect and the antiquary have each essayed to delineate them, and to hold them up to general admiration; and, despite the " botch-work by which it has been attempted to be repaired/' this little chantry, challenging competition with any similar structure in the kingdom, seldom fails to rivet the attention even of the casual passenger. In describing what he saw in 1799, an architect who made a tour throughout Yorkshire, and published his memoranda in The Gentleman's Magazine in 1806, under the title, t€ Pursuits of Architectural Innovation," states, that the east window had at that time much tracery; that the parapet was perforated; and that the windows on each side the building, north and south, were equally rich: " but all embellishment," he observes, " seems inconsiderable, and all praise inadequate, when referring to the west front." After particularising its inimitable Gothic ornaments, consisting of buttresses and recesses with pointed arched heads and lofty pediments; its entablature supporting niches, turrets, and basso-relievos, the latter crowned with small battlements—the tourist proceeds to supply the reader with an account of the subjects upon which the sculptor had expended the labours of his chisel:—" The basso-relievos," says he, " shew the Nativity, Resurrection, and Ascension*—the fourth not quite intelligible (being, with the rest, much mutilated), but appears to contain two personages, one on each side an altar." Supported by evidence of this character * A gentleman now resident in London, having examined this composition many years ago, remembers to have seen a representation of the soles of the feet of Christ immediately above the heads of the disciples; and the Rev. William Carr, of Bolton Abbey, has in his possession a rude caning of the Ascension similarly represented.