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Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Page 6
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Kilby, Thomas. Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 6. 1843. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 17, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/703.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas. (1843). Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 6. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/703

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Kilby, Thomas, Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account - Page 6, 1843, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 17, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/746/show/703.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Scenery in the vicinity of Wakefield, with a brief historical descriptive account
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Kilby, Thomas
Publisher Kilby, Thomas
Date 1843
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Wakefield, England
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
  • illustrations (layout features)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Extent 34 pages; 14 leaves; 38 cm
Original Item Location DA 690.W14K5 1843
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1816674~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_005
Item Description
Title Page 6
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_005_007.jpg
Transcript SANDAL CASTLE. This castle, which is described by an old historian* as " standing pleasantly upon a small hill, in view of the faire town of Wakefield," is generally supposed to have been built about 1320, by John Plantagenet, the last earl of Warren, who, being questioned by Edward I. €€ By what title he held the land ¥' resolutely drew his sword, and replied, H This is the title by which I hold it. William the Bastard did not conquer England himself. The Norman barons, and my ancestors among the rest, were joint adventurers in the enterprise." Whereupon Edward wisely withdrew his quo warranto. In the reign of Edward III. it was occupied by Edward Baliol, during the preparation for placing him on the Scottish throne. It subsequently became the residence of Richard Plantagenet, duke of York ; and, lastly, of the Duke of Gloucester, afterwards Richard III. Formerly this castle occupied an area of about six acres, and in the days of the Plantagenets was a place of feudal grandeur and strength, being surrounded by a deep trench, and rendered accessible only by means of a drawbridge. The mound, in the centre of which stood the tower, is extremely steep and precipitous, and commands extensive and beautiful prospects east and west. It was from this baronial fortress that the Yorkists, with Richard duke of York at their head, sallied forth to give battle to Queen Margaret. He had repaired thither on Christmas-eve, 1460, with about 5000 men, intending to wait the arrival of his son Edward, earl of March, who was then in Wales levying troops. Though the Lancastrians had sustained a signal defeat in the battle of Northampton, in which Henry VI. was taken prisoner, the duke was, nevertheless, unwilling to risk an engagement with Margaret of Anjou until properly reinforced. Conscious of her own superiority of numbers, which she had dexterously concealed from her enemy, she appeared before the walls of Sandal Castle, and, using the most insulting epithets, dared him to the unequal conflict, observing, that " it was disgraceful to a man who aspired to a crown to suffer himself to be shut up by a woman." Goaded almost to madness by this species of attack, which to a proud and warlike spirit was more galling than any artillery she could have employed against him, he, contrary to the advice of the Earl of Salisbury and Sir David Hall, t€ an ancient servant of his, and a great soldier/- quitted the defences of his castle and appeared in the open plain. He had not proceeded far when he was attacked both in flank and rear;—in rear by two detachments, which had lain in ambush, under the joint command of the Earl of Wiltshire and the Lord Clifford; in flank by the Dukes of Somerset and Exeter, who commanded the main army, consisting of about 20,000 men. By this stratagem on the part of the queen, Richard found himself enclosed, and unable to offer any effectual resistance. In the space of half an hour the duke with his little army was discomfited and put to the sword; and it is supposed that he was slain by the hand of Clifford, who had sworn eternal hostility to every member of his family. Be this as it may, I believe it is a well-ascertained fact, that this ruthless soldier cut off the duke's head immediately after the battle ;t and having encircled it with a paper crown, in derision of his pretended title, conveyed it in triumph to the queen. Pleased with the device, and forgetful of female delicacy, she not only applauded the act and joined with him in his brutal exultation, but afterwards ordered the head with its * Speed, who appears to have taken his narrative from Grafton's Chronicle and Stowe's Annals, f See Gentleman's Magazine, Aug. 1802, p. 708.