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Select views in Greece, Volume 2
Page 33
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Williams, Hugh William, 1773-1829. Select views in Greece, Volume 2 - Page 33. 1829. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/696/show/654.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, Hugh William, 1773-1829. (1829). Select views in Greece, Volume 2 - Page 33. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/696/show/654

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Williams, Hugh William, 1773-1829, Select views in Greece, Volume 2 - Page 33, 1829, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/696/show/654.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Select views in Greece, Volume 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Williams, Hugh William, 1773-1829
Publisher Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1829
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Greece--Pictorial works
Subject.Topical (Local)
  • art
  • illustrations
  • historic scenery
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Greece
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • plates (illustrations)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DF 723 .W54 1829 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3279276~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction This item is in the public domain and may be used freely.
Identifier exotic_201304_008
Item Description
Title Page 33
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_008_036.jpg
Transcript AEGOS. An ancient city, capital of Argolis in Peloponnesus, about two miles from the sea, on the bay called Argolicus Sinus. Juno was the chief deity of the place. The kingdom of Argos was founded by Inachus 1856 years before the Christian era, and after it had flourished for about 550 years, it was united to the crown of Mycenae. Argos was built, according to Euripides, Iphig. in Aulid. v. 152, 534, by seven Cyclops who came from Syria. These Cyclops were not Vulcan's workmen. The nine first kings of Argos were called Inachides, in honour of the founder. Their names were Inachus, Phoroneus, Apis, Argus, Chryasus, Phorbas, Triopas, Stelonus, and Gelanor. Gelanor gave a kind reception to Danaus, who drove him from his kingdom in return for his hospitality. The descendants of Danaus were called Belides. Agamemnon was king of Argos during the Trojan war; and 80 years after, the Heraclidae seized the Peloponnesus, and deposed the monarchs. The inhabitants of Argos were called Argivi and Argolici; and this name has been often applied to all the Greeks without distinction. " To yap iraXcucv Apyog, bv iru'deig, rote, Tr)g oiaTpowXriyog dXcrog 'Iyay^ou Koprjg. *AvTt] 0*' 'Op£0TCl, TOV XvKOKTOVOV QeUV 'Ayopa AvKeiog 6v£ apiurepag t' ble 'llpag 6 kXeivoq vaog oi I' iKavofxev, ifraaKEiv Mi/Kqvac Tag woXvxpvfTOvg bpav IioXv(f)dopov Te lo)fjia YleXoirihov role." Sophocl. Electr. 4. " Lo ! this is ancient Argos—this the city Which thou hast sought so long; the wooded haunt Of Inachus' sad daughter, whence she fled Chased by the avenging gad-fly. This, Orestes, This is the street of the Lycean god, The wolf-destroyer. There upon the left Is Juno's famous temple. Where we stand Thou mayest behold Mycenae's palaces, Splendid with gold. It is indeed the home Of the dark-destined Pelopidae." J. P.