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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 43
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 43. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/94.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 43. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/94

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 43, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/94.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 43
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_060.jpg
Transcript PHOENICIA AND LEBANON. 43 the commerce of Solomon between Ophir and his ports of Elath and Ezion Geber was carried on by Tyrian sailors, the descendants of the old Sidonian navigators. But alas ! Great Sidon is now only little Saida, " the place of fishing." Its seamen are mere coasting sailors running their little feluccas and shakhturs along the Syrian shores, while its contracted harbour can hardly shelter its tiny craft (see page 45). The ancient city, so often built, destroyed, and re-built, is now a town of nine thousand inhabitants, and in it? want of business life and enterprise, a typical oriental city. The Israelites never conquered it, but the Egyptians, Assyrians, and Persians subdued it, and it opened its gates to the two-horned Alexander in 332 b.c. Under the Romans it was a wealthy city, and it continued such during the New Testament times, when our Lord visited the borders of Tyre and Sidon. St. Paul found Christian friends here on his voyage to Rome. Its Bishop Theodorus was present at the Council of Nice, 325 a.d. During the crusades Sidon was alternately in the hands of the Franks and the Muslims, and suffered terribly from capture and re-capture by the hostile armies. The town is situated on the north-western slope of a low promontory extending down to the sea. In front of the sea wall a chain of island rocks runs from north to south, formerly enclosing a harbour large enough to hold fifty galleys ; but the Druse prince, Fakhr ed Din, filled it up with stones and earth to prevent the entrance of Turkish ships, and now only the little shakhturs of Kozta Jiz and his fellow sailors can find anchorage in the shallow waters. Sidon is a walled town, and, unlike Beirut, which has overleaped its walls and spread for miles around, it keeps closely pent up within its narrow limits. A more compact city could hardly be imagined, for not only are the streets too narrow to allow loaded camels to pass each other with facility, but the houses are to a great extent built on arches over the streets, so that one can ride or walk from one end of the town to the other under dark, gloomy tunnels. Within the town are six great khans, called by the people wakkaleh, or agencies. They are quadrangular, built around a large paved courtyard, two stories high, with numerous rooms for travellers and storehouses for merchandise. But Beirut has destroyed the commerce of Sidon, and the caravans, bringing the wheat and butter of the Hauran to Beirut and carrying back the wares of Europe, pass by Sidon, outside the walls. About seven hundred of the people are Muslims, five hundred Jews, and the rest Catholics, Maronites, and Protestants. There is a female seminary under the care of the American Mission, with forty-five boarders and ninety day scholars, and a boys' high school. The French Sceurs de Charite have also a girls' school, the Jesuits a school for boys, and the Muslim Benevolent Society a boys' school. The fruit gardens and orchards of Sidon, extending half a mile from the walls, are the pride of its people, and abound in oranges, lemons, sweet lemons, figs, apricots, pomegranates, almonds, plums, apples, peaches, pears, citrons, and bananas, which are exported by sea to Beirut and Alexandria, and by land to all the towns of Lebanon and to Damascus. The view of the plain and town from the Neby Yahia, or Tomb of John the Baptist, a mile to the east, in the month of April is extremely beautiful. A more verdant glade than that south of the