Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 42
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 42. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/92.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 42. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/92

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 42, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/92.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 42
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_058.jpg
Transcript 1 '""M" 42 PICTVRl V PALESTINE. SAIDA, or SIDON. sidonaque pulchram." '* The go<: Sidon the beautiful." Tl I from two of the later Latin poets sum up the two striking features i the history of Sidon, the antiquity of its religious cult, and the beauty of its scener i^ was the Divine ( ity, which to the Phoenicians, and through them to Greece and Cartl as the Jerusalem of Baal worship. Here was worshipped that divine Phoenician religion, Baal Sidon and Ashtaroth, the same which at Geba] (JebetQ was called Thainmu/ and Baalath, at Carthage Baal llamon and Tanith, among the Hittil Shed and Shedath, and in Damascus lladad and Atargath. Here was the home M Astoreth, whom the Phc ' d Ast.i . ■ n with CTMCent horns : To wl it image nightly by the moon, Sidoniaa virgini paid their vow-, and poo The hardy n of sidon and Tyre, in pushing their adventurous prows into the El the I -in, and beyond the Pillars of Hercules, carried with them their rel aid their peculiar diviniti Their Ashtaroth became Aphrodite in Gn tnd the tempi Tl an was dedicated to Melkarth, the Tyrian Hercules. In the island of Malta a d( ription speaks of " the lord Melkarth, Baal of Tyn Old Sidon, named by the grandson of \oah,and Styled Great Xidon by Joshua, tic t living (ity in the world, and claims the honour of being mentioned both in ' and in the I lomeric poems. I lomer speaks of Sidon as rich in OW ; butil «»res : native, excepting the iron, brought down from Southern Lebanon. It> ; brought from Britain (Ber-el tank), Spain, and the Caucasus, its steel from Colchis, its gold I copper from the Red Sea and Cyprus, and the Sidonian and Tyrian art: for their broi ad other works in metallurgy. • Sidonians wore already a commercial nation when the Egyptians expelled the shepherd kings, and from the first half of the seventeenth till the end of the thirteenth Itury i:.< .. the Sidonians wore subject to the Egyptians. A papyrus in the British Museum contains the account of an imaginary journey mad M Egyptian into Syria, at the r.n(\ of the reign of Rameses II., which indicates that rtt, Sidon, and l\io at that time were peaceful tributaries of Egypt The Sidonians supplied the mercantile and military navy of Egypt, and during this riod, when m^ rival na\ v existed, Sidonian trade and commercial | ' l,u:,r { point Beyond the Nile valley, the sailors of Sidon and BeirAtcoasted aL and founded Cambe, afterwards Carthage, and Hippo. The Egyptiai anling it as impure, and as the domain of Set, th ' oi ur) of Osiris. An Egyptian navy was therefore out of the question Sidoi id seamen manned the Egyptian fleets in the Mediterranean and the Red Sea, and