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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 34
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 34. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/83.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 34. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/83

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 34, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/83.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 34
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_049.jpg
Transcript am 34 PICTURESQl LESTINE. calendar. Th lems call him El Khidr. Near the bridge of seven arche irut is a Muslim mosque or Mazar, said to be his place of burial, and farther on tow A the city is a ruined tower on the north side of the road, claimed to be the place when George killed the Dragon and washed his hands of the bloody stains. We now enter Beirut, the metropolis of modern Phoenicia, and its most beautiful and most enlightened city. Its situation is all that could be desired, on the northern slope of a promoir which runs west for three miles from the Nahr Beirut to Ras Beirut | jje where the changes of temperature through the successive months of the year are so gradual that autumn fades imperceptibly into winter, and winter itself is a genial spring, and spring warms into summer with hardly a change of half a degree a day, you have th- aion of climate, and do not wonder that the Greek poet should call it " the nurse of tranquil lift Beirut is the Berytus of the ancients, and was probably founded by the Phoenicians. It is the common opinion that its name is derived from its wells, Beer-oth, but M. Kenan labours, in his u Mission de Phenicie," to prove that the name was taken from its Pineto or Pi " called in the Chaldee nh3, Beeroth, and rendered in the Arabic Bible snobar, or \ trees." But in this view M. Renan stands alone. In the verse Cant. i. 17, to which he r< the Chaldee word is rendered, in Dr. V. Dyck's Arabic translation of the Bible, cypress. Robinson gives both cypress and pine as the meaning of " Beroth." rut has celebrated both for its wells and its pines, and the pinegrove of Beirut is certainl) striking feature than its brackish wells could have been in former times, but the \\< traditional authority is in favour of the wells. Strabo first mentions the city in 140 lu., when it was destroyed by Tryphon during the reign of Demetrius Nicator, The Romans rebuilt it and colonised it with veterans of the fifth Macedonian and eighth Augustan legions, It was here that the two sons of Herod the Great were tried unheard and in their . and condemned to death by their cruel and unnatural father. The Elder Agrippa greatly favoured the city, and adorned it with a splendid theatre and amphitheatre, besides baths and porticoes, inaugurating them with games and spectacles of every kind, including show gladiators. Here, too, after the destruction of Jerusalem, Titus celebrated the birthday d his father, Vespasian, by similar exhibitions in which many of the captive Jews perished. In the middle of the third century a celebrated Roman law school was founded !• Students flocked to it from all countries, including Gregory Thaumaturgus and Apion, the martyr. Apollinaris taught grammar here in the fourth century. After the death ot Julian the Apostate the Emperor Jovian compelled one Magnus, wdio had demolished the Church iA Berytus, to rebuild it at his own cost. From 250 a.d. to 550 was the golden of literature in Beirut, which reached its zenith in the reign of Justinian, who regarded the Beirut school with special favour. On the 9th of July, 551, this city was destroyed DJ earthquake, and its learned men went for a season to Sidon. In the seventh centu Khaled, -the Sword of Mohammed," swept over the land. Beirut fell into Muslim band* and its decline was rapid and complete.