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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 30
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 30. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/79.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 30. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/79

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 30, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/79.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 30
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_045.jpg
Transcript 30 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. in a vertical position, and the rains and storms of centuries have worn away the softer leaving the harder veins standing upright, often to a height of forty or fifty feet. Tl im the most grotesque shapes, resembling " columns, blocks, houses, round and square tov castles, fortresses," spires and shafts; and the road passes through the midst of them, sometn by very narrow clefts. In the western part of the village is a good camping ground, but every available rod of soil is occupied by the mulberry, the staple product of this par- Lebanon. This district is the Kesrawan, or broken region, a chaos of rugged mountain- the stronghold and holy mountain of the Maronites. Monasteries, nunneries, and churches seen in every direction ; the monks own the best part of the land, and the people arc lar their tenants. The industry of the people is remarkable. They have quarried the rocks and built terrace walls like steps up the sides of these steep mountains, and wrest a livelihood from the soil. The insecurity of the great plains east and north-east of Lebanon has dri\ people into these mountain fastnesses; and in the civil wars of Lebanon, when the Dr south of the Damascus road have everywhere defeated the Maronites, this region has 1 regarded as impregnable. The Maronites are a fine race, and if once freed from the ecclesiastical tyranny of the bishops and monks and given possession of the immense mona for the purposes of education, they would become a power in the East. As it is, they arc for their way upward and reaching positions of influence throughout Syria and Egypt From Ajeltun (see page 25) we descend gradually over a rocky road towards the having on our left the deep chasm of the Nahr el Kelb (see page 21), and in front west a fine view of the promontory of Beirut (see page 28), some twenty miles distant. About three miles and a half from the mouth of the Dog River, on the north side of the gorge there are three grottoes, from two of which water issues, and from these comes th supply of water in the summer, when the fountains of 'Asal and Lebban are diverted for irrigating purposes. The late Dr. Thomson, the author of " The Land and the Book," firsl noticed these caves, but the first full exploration of them was made in September, 1S7;, by W. T. Maxwell, C.E., aided by H. G. Huxley, C.E., Dr. Bliss, President of the S. I\ < in Beirut, and Dr. Brigstocke, M.R.C.S., of Beirut. Provided with a raft of inflated goat-skins and a small boat, with a good supply of lights and magnesium wire, they brought their and raft into the entrance, down the rugged descent to the main grotto, and launched forth on the still, clear waters of the subterranean lake. After sailing six hundred feet, they reached a rock barrier fifteen feet in height, which compelled them to leave the raft. 1 hey then climbed over the rock screen and along a lofty ledge for seven hundred feet, when, lighti: magnesium wire, a scene o[ great magnificence burst upon their vision. As one ot tli' s,4' From the lofty vaulted roof and precipitous sides hung massive stalactites, between wnicn the rocks were studded with others of a more slender and graceful make, while from 1 shot up in wild profusion stalagmites which towered aloft, in some cases almost reaching tnei pendant companions/' From these caves we pass down the river ^n'^e by the stone aqueduct and th<