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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 27
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 27. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/76.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 27. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/76

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 27, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/76.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 27
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_042.jpg
Transcript PHOENICIA AND LEBANON. 27 the valley below are everywhere cultivated and verdant in the summer, with mulberry, walnut, and other fruit-trees, and with fields of wheat and barley. After a half-hour's ride southward along the base of the giant cliff overhanging the valley, we reach the natural bridge of El Akura, over the mouth of a cave (see page 13). It is formed by a fallen rock which once evidently constituted the roof of the cavern's mouth, and has now settled down, covering the channel of the Neb'a Ruweis, which issues from the cave. Leaving our horses on the bridge, under the overhanging cliff, we took our staves to steady our steps over the mud-slimed stones in the bottom of the cave, and, lighting our wax candles, slid down the declivity into the mouth of the cavern. The roof is from ten to twenty feet in height, and we walked or groped along for four hundred feet, when the cavern suddenly divided into two branches, the one on the right muddy and rough, and that on the left clean, overarched with wax-like stalactites, and floored with stalagmitic mounds, between which, on a pebbly bed, runs a stream of water so crystal clear, that I stepped into a pool a foot deep, supposing it to be dry. We traced this bright gallery for about four hundred feet, when it terminated suddenly in a lofty arched room, whose perpendicular wall stopped our progress. But some twenty feet up the side of this wall is the mouth of another vast cavern, which could not be reached without ladders, and we were obliged to retreat. From El Akura (see page 15) to the fountain of Afka (see page 16) is a ride of an hour and a half along a tableland overhanging a valley covered with wheat-fields and scattered trees, until, turning to the south-east, we come to the Maronite village of El Mnetira, which faces southwards towards the fountain, to which we descend over a steep rocky road. This historic fountain of Afka (Apheca) issues from the cave, and from the limestone strata below it, which descend in stair-like gradations to the road, and below it to the deep gorge of the river Adonis (Nahr Ibrahim) (see page 17). The great cliff wall rises abruptly above the fountain from one thousand to fifteen hundred feet, and the water bursts forth from the recess formed by the sudden turning of the cliffs from a north and south to a westerly direction, and dashes down into a rock basin fifty feet below. We cross this basin on a bridge, which leads us to a ruined temple one hundred feet in length by fifty in width; this is without doubt the ancient temple of Venus, which was destroyed by the Emperor Constantine in the fourth century. A fountain still issues through the vaulted passage under the ruins, and there were probably artificial outlets for the water at various points under the temple. This is the principal source of the river Adonis of the ancients, and latterly known as the Nahr Ibrahim. Here was the scene of the ancient mythological fable of Venus and Adonis, and of the weeping for Adonis annually by the maidens of Phoenicia. The Lebanon maidens chanted, " I mourn Adonis; the fair Adonis is dead : dead is the fair Adonis, whom the gods lament." Adonis was Adon, the Baal god, the sun—the same in meaning with Tammuz, the present Arabic name of the month July, which was the month of the feast of Adonis. The scarlet anemone of Lebanon was thought to be stained with his blood. Leaving the Temple and Fountain of Afka (see page 16), we ascend gradually towards