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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 22
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 22. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/71.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 22. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/71

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 22, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/71.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 22
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_037.jpg
Transcript 22 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. ferment and to obstruct the administration of justice. The Turks were determin peak u up this European compromise and place an Osmanli pasha over the whole of Lebanon Tl result was a bloody war, the frightful horrors of Deir el Kamr, Hasbeiya, Rashe: t ,es 371 and 376, vol. i.) and Damascus (see page 415, vol. i.), which forced the intervention of Europe, and resulted in the new Nizam or Reglement of Lebanon, which guaranty Christian pasha for the whole mountain under the joint protectorate of the six Europ Powers. Under the pasha are several kaimakams, generally chosen from the most nume: sect in the locality. Rustem Pasha is noted for his uncompromising hatred of bribe n-hancled justice, his efforts for civilising the people, and for road and bridge building in Southern and Central Lebanon. He promises like improvements in this well-nigh road: district of Northern Lebanon. Before ascending eastward to the Cedar amphitheatre, let us cross over the dazzling white chalk cliffs of Ras esh Shuk'ah to the valley of Nahr el Jozeh and visit th« IT Museilihah (see sketch map, page 12). The Tripoli coast-road to Beirut cr< this lofty promontory, called by the Creeks Theou Prosopon (Cape of the Divine Countenan and down its southern precipitous face on a slippery road, which follows the deep ravin* by the rains, and which change their course with every winter's storm. At the fool of this dangerous descent and on the right bank of the Walnut river, " Nahr el Jozeh/' stands on an isolated mass of cretaceous limestone the ancient " Kulat el Museilihah' e 11). The name signifies tk The Place of Weapons/' and there is probably no pass in Syria, unless it Wady el Kurn, on the Damascus road, where more robberies have been commit; The ile is one of the most picturesque in the Last, rising abruptly on its isolated rock, seemingl) a part of the rock itself, surrounded by wide-spreading trees and murmuring waters, and overhung by lofty and precipitous chalk cliffs. We now cross the Kura Plain eastward to the fine village of Kesba. plunge into the ravine of the Kadisha, and begin the ascent to Ehden. This village is perched on a lofty spur of the Jird, nearly five thousand feet above the sea, and commanding one of the subln landscape views in Lebanon. The magnificent fountain at Mar Sarkis sends a deep, bread, and crystal stream of almost ice-cold water through and around the village, producing a luxuriant growth of walnut, fir, mulberry, pine, and oak, with summer vegetables in abundance; wl maize, and the potato being largely cultivated. Ehden, or Eden, as it has been called, is the paradise of the Maronite priests, where as in Bsherreh, Hasrfin, and Kesrawan, they hold undisputed sway; but under the impartial rule the present pasha, their former theoeratic and despotic civil rule over the people has be reduced t<> .1 mere religious authority. I Mir present limits will not allow more than a passing allusion to the history ol the Maronite sect, now the dominant one in Lebanon. Their name is derived from Mar Mart hermit who lived in the liukaa, near Xel/a el 'Asy, in the fifth century. His follow condemned by the Council of Constantinople, a.d. 68l, as holding the monothehte hen being driven from the cities and towns of Syria, they took refuge in the fastiv