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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 18
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 18. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/67.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 18. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/67

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 18, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/67.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 18
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_033.jpg
Transcript PIC7 LXL. ing rapidly into the e of the river, you walk for a few minutes among | nj a and murmuring waters to the convent of the Mullawiyeh ! hes, who perform their dances every Friday afternoon, at certain US of the year, I ha\ a it cn ... men below and women above behind the latticed screen, when eight tl of th k*. whirled in the literally giddy mazes of the dance for two hours, until the jx^rformcrs fell the floor exhausted, and the audience retir This charming spot is a favourite resort of th#> Tripolitans, and in the month of April, when the orange and lemon gi im| arouiki arc in full bloom, and the air tilled with the delicio ;ranee, this quiet a is a nbr one never \\ i 8), Between the mouth of the Kadisha, on the northern shore, and El Mma. a: ral fine tow ;t stone, standing like sentinels along the shoi Th tiled Burj 1 Neb'a, Burj es Seb'a (Lion's Tower), Burj et raktyeh (Traveller1 iurj el Mughari (Algerines), and Burj esh Sheikh Affin. These arc evidently m« tl structures, and built on foundations made up of ancient granite columns and fragments of G The) are now being rapidly razed, to supply stone for more modern structui El Mina (sec page 5) has a population of Seven thousand, chictl k fisherin- divers, who obtain an ample livelihood from their laborious and perilous pro! >n^(> crop amounting to ,£20,000 a year. The steel tracked tramwa> from down the broad level road between the gardens to the Mma and th< The modern rripolitans are proud of their fine scenery, their gardens and spark] their fruil 1 and flowers, their sea and mountain landscape. The Gr< rian women «.t ; are noted for their beauty, and not a few of them are acquiring, through education 11 schools, the higher charm of intellectual and moral cultivation. The Boys1 High S and the Female Seminary, on the American mission premises, are affording the youth ^i both sexes ul advant >r education. The French Sisters of Charity have also an institut' The Orthodox Greeks have opened schools, and the Mohammedans have formed a Benevolent Intentions" to maintain schools for girls and b The proposed railwa this point to Hums and the Euphrates valley will, if completed, make Tripoli the most important commercial port on the entire Syrian coast. The range of Lebanoi for a hundred miles, is a great treasure ho in its geology, botany, ethno! &d archaeology, Its lofty summits, its frightful deep caverns a\\A subterranean lakes, its magnificent fountains and C its DObl< vineyards, walnut ami olive groves, its ruined temples and name! ltiqinty, monasteries, churches, khulwehs (Druse chapels), and palao one thousand two hundred villages, and its peculiarly (Oriental population, combine to maki fruitful th' tudy, alike inter to the traveller and tl bolariyt patient explorer. Lebanon, the \\'hit mtain, i^v Mont Blanc learning white limestone rocks. The Arabs divide Lebanon into three ton ul, the \\ asat. and the Jird. 1st. The Nihil is the littoral or OKI